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ALLEN v. HANKS.

decided: May 19, 1890.

ALLEN
v.
HANKS.



APPEAL FROM THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS.

Author: Harlan

[ 136 U.S. Page 301]

 MR. JUSTICE HARLAN delivered the opinion of the court.

This suit involves the title to certain lands in Arkansas, which the appellee, a married woman, claims to constitute her separate estate, and, as such, not liable for the debts of her husband, James M. Hanks.

By the laws of Arkansas in force when the appellee and her husband were married, (Rev. Stat. Ark. 1858; Gould's Dig. 765, c. 111,) it was provided that (§ 1) "any married woman may become seized and possessed of any property, real and personal, by direct bequest, devise, gift or distribution in her own right and name and as of her own property: Provided, The same does not come from the husband after coverture;" that (§ 7) "before any married woman shall be entitled to the

[ 136 U.S. Page 302]

     privileges and benefits of the provisions of this chapter, she shall cause to be filed in the recorder's office, in the county where she lives, a schedule of the property derived through her, and no property belonging to any married woman shall be exempt from the payment of any debts contracted by her husband previous to the filing of the schedule aforesaid," and that (§ 8) "whenever the deed, bequest, grant, decree or other transfer of property of any kind to any married woman shall expressly set forth that the same is designed to be held exempt from the liabilities of her husband, such property with the natural increase thereof shall be deemed and considered as belonging exclusively to such married woman, under the provisions of this chapter, and shall not be liable to execution or sale for the payment of debts of her husband, whether contracted before or after the accruing of the title of the wife: Provided, That no conveyance from any married man to his wife, either directly or indirectly, shall entitle her to any benefits or privileges of this act."

In 1868 a new constitution was adopted, and among its provisions was one declaring: "The real and personal property of any female in this State, acquired either before or after marriage, whether by gift, grant, inheritance, devise or otherwise, shall, so long as she may choose, be and remain the separate estate and property of such female, and may be devised or bequeathed by her, the same as if she were a feme sole. Laws shall be passed providing for the registration of the wife's separate property, and when so registered, and so long as it is not entrusted to the management or control of the husband otherwise than as an agent, it shall not be liable for any of his debts, engagements or obligations." Art. XII, § 6.

This was followed in 1873 by an act providing that (Gantt's Dig. Stat. Ark. 1874, § 4193, p. 756) "the property, both real and personal, which any married owman now owns or has had conveyed to her by any person in good faith and without prejudice to existing creditors, or which she may have acquired as her sole and separate property; that which comes to her by gift, bequest, descent, grant or conveyance from any person;

[ 136 U.S. Page 303]

     that which she has acquired by her trade, business, labor or services carried on or performed on her sole or separate account; that which a married woman in this State holds or owns at the time of her marriage, and the rents, issues and proceeds of all such property, shall, notwithstanding her marriage, be and remain her sole and separate property, and may be used, collected and invested by her in her own name, and shall not be subject to the interference or control of her husband, or liable for his debts, except such debts as may have been contracted for the support of herself or her children by her as his agent;" that, § 4201, "before any married woman shall be entitled to the privileges of this act in respect to property held by her separately as aforesaid, she shall cause her said separate property to be recorded in her name in the county where she lives or has a residence;" and that, § 4203, "the property of a woman, whether real or personal, and whether acquired before or after marriage, in her own right, shall not be sold to pay the debts of the husband contracted or damages incurred by him before marriage."

By the constitution of Arkansas of 1874, it was declared that "the real and personal property of any feme covert in this State, acquired either before or after marriage, whether by gift, grant, inheritance, devise or otherwise, shall, so long as she may choose, be and remain her separate estate and property, and may be devised, bequeathed or conveyed by her the same as if she were a feme sole, and the same shall not be subject to the debts of her husband." Art. IX, § 7.

The present suit depends upon the construction of these statutory and constitutional provisions, as applied to certain facts disclosed in this case, in respect to which there is no dispute. These facts will now be stated.

James M. Hanks and the appellee were married in the State of Arkansas in the year 1859. During that year a child was born to them, alive, and capable of inheriting. It died in 1862. John F. Hanks, the owner of considerable property, real and personal, in the State of Arkansas, including the lands in dispute, died in 1864, his ...


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