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DAGGS v. PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK.

decided: April 30, 1900.

DAGGS
v.
PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK.



APPEAL FROM THE SUPREME COURT OF THE TERRITORY OF ARIZONA.

Author: Mckenna

[ 177 U.S. Page 554]

 MR. JUSTICE McKENNA, after making the foregoing statement, delivered the opinion of the court.

We are confined by the record to the points passed on by the Supreme Court of the Territory, to wit, the defence of usury, and the motion for judgment on the counter-claim.

(1.) By section 5197 of the Revised Statutes of the United States a national bank may charge on any note interest at the rate allowed by the laws of the State or Territory where it is situated. It is further provided, however, that if no rate is fixed by such laws the bank may not charge a greater rate than 7 per cent, and if a greater rate be knowingly charged, the entire interest agreed to be paid shall be forfeited. (Sec. 5198.)

The laws of the Territory are as follows:

"2161. SEC. 1. When there is no express agreement fixing a different rate of interest, interest shall be allowed at the rate of seven per cent per annum on all moneys after they become due on any bond, bill, promissory note or other instrument in writing, or any judgment recovered in any court in this Territory, for money lent, for money due on any settlement of accounts from the day on which the balance is ascertained and for money received for the use of another."

"2162. SEC. 2.Parties may agree in writing for the payment of any rate of interest whatever on money due or to become due on any contract; any judgment rendered on such contract shall conform thereto, and shall bear the rate of interest agreed upon by the parties, and which shall be specified in the judgment."

The contention of appellant is that the rate of interest is not fixed by the laws of the Territory. It permits the parties to do so, but does not do so itself. In other words, it is urged that the rate is fixed by permission of the laws, and not by the laws, and upon this distinction a power which every person and every bank in the Territory has, it is contended, the national banks do not have.

[ 177 U.S. Page 555]

     We cannot accept this as a correct interpretation of either the spirit or the words of the national banking act. By that act, certainly no discrimination was intended against national banks, and that the interpretation contended for would seriously embarrass their business is manifest.

We said in Tiffany v. National Bank of Missouri, 18 Wall. 409, that national banks "were established for the purpose, in part, of providing a currency for the whole country, and in part to create a market for the loans of the general government. It could not have been intended, therefore, to expose them to the hazard of unfriendly legislation by the States, or to ruinous competition with state banks."

The language of the Revised Statutes is that national banks "may take, receive, reserve and charge on any loan . . . upon any note . . . interest allowed by the laws of the State, Territory or district" where located, "and no more, except that where by the laws of any State a different rate is limited for banks of issue organized under state laws, the rate so limited shall be allowed for associations organized or existing in any such State under this title." The italics are ours.

The meaning of these provisions is unmistakable. A national bank may charge interest at the rate allowed by the laws of the State or Territory where it is located; and ...


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