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Sanders v. Levy

June 30, 1976

IRVING SANDERS, PLAINTIFF-APPELLEE,
v.
LEON LEVY, ET AL., DEFENDANTS-APPELLANTS. EGON TAUSSIG, PLAINTIFF-APPELLEE, V. SIDNEY M. ROBBINS, ET AL., DEFENDANTS-APPELLANTS. MICHAEL SHAEV AND RITA SHAEV, PLAINTIFFS-APPELLEES, V. ERIC HAUSER, ET AL., DEFENDANTS-APPELLANTS



Appeal from an order of the Hon. Thomas F. Griesa, Judge. United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, holding the suit to be properly maintainable as a class action under Rule 23(b)(3), Fed. R. Civ. P., and directing that the defendant mutual investment fund bear substantial costs of extracting the names and addresses of the class members from computer tapes. Affirmed as to class action designation. Reversed as to allocation of identification costs.

Hays and Mulligan, Circuit Judges, and Palmieri, District Judge.*fn* Hays, Circuit Judge, dissenting in part.

Author: Palmieri

Palmieri, D. J.:

Plaintiffs-appellees (plaintiffs) seek to maintain this action on behalf of certain present and former stockholders of Oppenheimer Fund, Inc. (the Fund), an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, 15 U.S.C. § 80a-1 et seq. This is an appeal under 28 U.S.C. § 1291 from an interlocutory order holding the suit to be properly maintainable as a class action under Rule 23(b)(3), Fed. R. Civ. P., and directing the defendant-appellant (defendant) Fund to bear substantial costs in identifying the names and addresses of the class members so that plaintiffs can send them the initial notice of the pending action as required by Rule 23(c)(2), Fed. R. Civ. P.

When the motion for class determination was made, there were over 67 million shares of the Fund outstanding held by approximately 173,000 shareholders. Of the approximately 121,000 present or former shareholders who constitute the class designated by the plaintiffs, about 103,000 remain shareholders and 18,000 have sold their shares. The information needed by plaintiffs for the preparation of the notice to the members of the class, particularly the names and addresses of the class members, is contained in magnetic computer tapes kept by the transfer agent of the Fund. The extraction of this information from the tapes would require, in addition to the usual processing, the design of new computer programs. The cost of accomplishing this task was estimated by the transfer agent to be $16,580 as of October 10, 1973.

On each of the issues presented, identification costs and designation as a manageable class action, we must first decide if the issue is reviewable on appeal and, if so, then determine if the district court's decision should be upheld. Since we find that our treatment of the identification costs matter affects the designation question, we discuss the identification costs matter first.

The Allocation of Identification Costs

The order requiring the Fund to bear the identification costs is appealable because it fits squarely within the collateral order doctrine of Cohen v. Beneficial Loan Corp., 337 U.S. 541, 93 L. Ed. 1528, 69 S. Ct. 1221 (1949). The requirements of that doctrine are essentially twofold: first, the decision appealed from must not be "tentative, informal or incomplete," 337 U.S. at 546, but rather it must conclusively settle a party's claim; second, the decision must involve a collateral matter that can be reviewed apart from the merits of the case but which cannot be effectively reviewed on appeal from the final judgment. In Eisen v. Carlisle & Jacquelin (Eisen IV), 417 U.S. 156, 40 L. Ed. 2d 732, 94 S. Ct. 2140 (1974), the Supreme Court faced the question whether this court had jurisdiction in Eisen v. Carlisle & Jacquelin (Eisen III), 479 F.2d 1005 (2d Cir. 1973) when we reviewed the district court's order imposing notice costs on the defendants. The Supreme Court decided that the order was appealable because it was "'a final disposition of a claimed right which is not an ingredient of the cause of action and does not require consideration with it.'" 417 U.S. at 172, quoting Cohen, supra, 337 U.S. at 546-47. See also, General Motors Corp. v. City of New York, 501 F.2d 639, 647 (2d Cir. 1974). We find this question of appealability controlled by Eisen IV.

We turn next to the merits of the order allocating identification costs. Rule 23(c)(2), Fed. R. Civ. P., provides in relevant part:

In any class action maintained under subdivision (b)(3), the court shall direct to the members of the class the best notice practicable under the circumstances, including individual notice to all members who can be identified through reasonable effort.

Since this is a class action brought under subdivision (b)(3) of the rule, namely, one in which the court below found that the questions of law or fact common to the members of the class predominate over any questions affecting only the individual members, and that the class action was superior to other available methods, individual notice of the action must be sent to all class members who can be identified by name and address through a reasonable effort. Eisen IV, 417 U.S. at 173-77. The cost of such notice must be borne in the first instance by plaintiff. Id. 417 U.S. at 177-79; Eisen III, 479 F.2d 1005, 1009 (2d Cir. 1973); Eisen II, 391 F.2d 555, 568 (2d Cir. 1968). The authorities just cited enunciate the views of the Supreme Court and this court that, absent special circumstances, if the plaintiff does not accept this expense, the class action cannot be maintained. In the usual case, defendants may not be compelled to provide financial support for a class action against themselves.

Where, as here, the relationship between the parties is truly adversary, the plaintiff must pay for the cost of notice as a part of the ordinary burden of financing his own suit.

Eisen IV, 417 U.S. at 178-79.

The possibility that plaintiff may not be required to defray the cost of notice is still an open question in some cases. The Supreme Court declined to foreclose the possibility in "situations where a fiduciary duty pre-existed between the plaintiff and defendant, as in a shareholder derivative suit." Eisen IV, supra, 417 U.S. at 178. In addition to the derivative suit, we have suggested that there may be other similar cases in which justification might be found for holding that a representative plaintiff is not obligated to defray the cost of notice, citing "a case where a public utility corporation which regularly sends monthly bills to its current customers has been held to have overcharged its customers and the class suit is brought to ...


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