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IN RE WEIS SECS.

January 21, 1977

In the Matter of Weis Securities, Inc.

Wyatt, District Judge.


The opinion of the court was delivered by: WYATT

WYATT, District Judge:

These are two appeals from an order of Bankruptcy Judge Babitt filed August 26, 1976. Appellants are (a) the trustee for the liquidation of the business of Weis Securities, Inc. (Weis) under the Securities Investor Protection Act of 1970 (SIPA, 15 U.S.C. § 78aaa and following) and (b) the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC). The order appealed from denied a motion of the trustee for summary judgment sustaining his objections to the claims of 24 different claimants who were subordinated lenders to Weis (sometimes called "claimants" and sometimes "subordinated lenders"). A thoughtful opinion had been filed by the Bankruptcy Judge on July 16, 1976. I am persuaded, however, that the able Bankruptcy Judge was in error and that the order appealed from must be reversed.

 1.

 Weis had been a prominent registered broker-dealer and a member of the New York Stock Exchange.

 The proceedings in which the trustee was appointed are described in Exchange National Bank v. Wyatt, 517 F.2d 453 (2d Cir. 1975). The trustee was appointed on May 30, 1973; the "filing date" (15 U.S.C. § 78eee(b)(4)(B)) was May 24, 1973. Weis is in liquidation under SIPA.

 2.

 The securities business is much regulated, necessarily so after the 1929 stock market crash and the conditions which preceded it.

 The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. § 78a and following; the 1934 Act) required brokers to have a certain amount of capital. Section 8(b) of the 1934 Act (15 U.S.C. § 78h(b)) required that the capital of a broker firm be at least 1/20 the amount of the total indebtedness of the broker firm. Expressed in another way, the 1934 Act was designed to protect the customers of a broker against his insolvency; this was to be done, among other ways, by preventing him from borrowing more than twenty times his net capital.

 The New York Stock Exchange had its own rule as to net capital requirements. This was its Rule 325 which provided that the indebtedness of a member could not be more than 15 times the net capital of such member.

 In 1938, the 1934 Act was amended to give the SEC authority to issue regulations with respect to the "financial responsibility" of brokers. 15 U.S.C. § 78 o (c)(3). The SEC issued a regulation (17 CFR § 240.15c3-1) which provided that no broker could have indebtedness of more than 20 times his net capital. Because the New York Stock Exchange rule was more restrictive than this, the SEC regulation was not applicable to members of that Exchange. Weis was a member of the New York Stock Exchange.

 3.

 In meeting the net capital requirements of the SEC and of the Exchange, the practice developed of brokers borrowing money on a subordinated basis, that is, the lenders agreed that their claims would be subordinated to general creditors. Where such agreements were approved by the Exchange, the indebtedness was excluded in calculating compliance with the net capital rule of the Exchange. This was an explicit provision of Rule 325(b)(2)(E) of the Exchange, which excluded from the aggregate indebtedness of a member "liabilities subordinated to general creditors pursuant to a separate agreement approved by the Exchange". In substance the subordinated loans, with the knowledge of the lenders, were used as capital for purposes of the net capital rules.

 Weis, in attempting to comply with the net capital rules, borrowed from lenders who agreed that their claims would be subordinated to the general creditors of Weis. Also Weis had in 1969 bought certain assets from another broker-dealer, Winslow, Cohu & Stetson Incorporated ("Winslow"). Winslow was a member of the New York Stock Exchange and had borrowed from subordinated lenders.

 It should be obvious, but may bear mentioning, that subordinated lenders are paid for the added risks which they knowingly assume. They receive all income from all securities loaned, in addition to interest at rates usually above normal. Here, for example, Weis undertook to pay 10% interest to most of the lenders and not less than 8%. We are told that in fact Weis paid $750,000 to these lenders before the trustee was appointed.

 4.

 After the trustee was appointed for Weis on May 30, 1973, claims were filed by some 50 subordinated lenders to Weis.

 On April 24, 1974, the trustee filed an "application for an order confirming the trustee's position with respect to claims of subordinated lenders". This position was that the subordination agreements should be enforced in accordance with their terms, that claims of fraud by the subordinated lenders even if proved would not avoid the subordination agreements because every customer and creditor of Weis had relied on those agreements "either expressly or constructively", and that the claims of subordinated lenders to Weis should not be paid until the general unsecured creditors of Weis had been paid in full.

 On April 24, 1974, Judge Babitt made and filed an order requiring the subordinated lenders and SEC and SIPC to show cause why the ...


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