Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Kirkland v. New York State Department of Correctional Services

decided: June 8, 1983.

EDWARD L. KIRKLAND, JOSEPH P. BATES, SR., ARTHUR E. SUGGS, EACH INDIVIDUALLY AND ON BEHALF OF ALL OTHERS SIMILARLY SITUATED, PLAINTIFFS-APPELLEES,
v.
THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES; THOMAS A. COUGHLIN, III, INDIVIDUALLY AND IN HIS CAPACITY AS COMMISSIONER OF THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES; THE NEW YORK STATE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION; JOSEPH VALENTI, INDIVIDUALLY AND IN HIS CAPACITY AS PRESIDENT OF THE NEW YORK STATE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION AND CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER; JOSEPHINE GAMBINO AND JAMES MCFARLAND, EACH INDIVIDUALLY AND IN HIS/HER CAPACITY AS CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER, DEFENDANTS-APPELLEES, FREDERICK E. ALTHISER, ET AL., INTERVENORS-APPELLANTS-APPELLEES, ROBERT J. MCCLAY, ET AL., INTERVENORS-APPELLEES-APPELLANTS



Appeal by intervenors in action under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. §§ 2000e to 2000e-17, from two orders of Judge Griesa of the Southern District of New York. The first order allowed intervenors to intervene on the condition that their intervention would be limited to the purpose of objecting to a proposed settlement between plaintiffs-appellees and defendants-appellees, and the second order approved the settlement. Affirmed.

Feinberg, Chief Judge, Lumbard and Kearse, Circuit Judges.

Author: Lumbard

LUMBARD, Circuit Judge:

Edward Kirkland and other minority Correction Sergeants in the New York State Department of Correctional Services ("DOCS") brought this class action on January 15, 1982 alleging that Promotional Examination No. 36-808 ("Exam 36-808"), given on October 3, 1981 for the position of Correction Lieutenant by DOCS and the New York Civil Service Commission ("CSC"), and Exam 36-808's resulting eligibility list are racially discriminatory against blacks and hispanics in violation of, inter alia, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. §§ 2000e to 2000e-17 (1976 and Supp. IV 1980).*fn1 On August 20, 1982, pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 23(e), the parties submitted proposals of settlement to Judge Griesa of the Southern District of New York. After due notice, Judge Griesa held hearings on September 29 and October 4 and 14, 1982 during which he heard objections from two groups of non-class members ("intervenors"), i.e., non-minority correctional officers, who, at the September 29, 1982 hearing, had been permitted to intervene on the condition that their intervention would be solely for the purpose of objecting to the proposed settlement. On November 9, 1982, Judge Griesa approved the settlement and filed an opinion on December 1, 1982. 552 F. Supp. 667. In their appeal, intervenors challenge Judge Griesa's grant of conditional intervention as well as his approval of the settlement. On November 16, 1982, on intervenors' motion, we stayed Judge Griesa's order of approval and expedited argument of the appeal. We affirm.

I. BACKGROUND

A. Exam 36-808 and its Resulting Eligibility List.

Exam 36-808, a written test consisting of sixty multiple choice items, was administered by CSC on October 3, 1981 to 739 candidates, of whom 169 (22.9%) were minority. Of the 625 candidates who passed the test, 148 (22.0%) were minority. Thus, minority candidates had an overall pass rate of 88% (148 out of 169 minority candidates passed), only slightly below the 92% pass rate of non-minorities (527 non-minority candidates passed).

On December 23, 1981, CSC certified an eligibility list ranking the passing candidates according to their final scores, which were calculated by adding seniority and veterans' credits to the candidates' adjusted scores.*fn2 Although the overall minority representation on the eligibility list (22.0%) was approximately the same as the minority representation in the total candidates pool (22.9%), minority representation within the eligibility list's rank-ordering system was disproportionately low at the list's top and high at the list's bottom.*fn3 A racial/ethnic breakdown of the candidates' raw scores, which reflect only the number of correct answers given, shows that the awarding of seniority and veterans' credits to qualifying candidates did not play a significant role in causing the uneven distribution of minorities on the eligibility list.*fn4

Appointments according to rank-order on the eligibility list began in early January, 1982. Of 171 initial appointments, 17 (9.9%) were minority. By July 28, 1982, 222 candidates had been promoted to Correction Lieutenant, of whom only 20 (9.0%) were minority. As of September 29, 1982, 225 appointments had been made, of which 21 (9.3%) went to minority candidates.

B. The Settlement Agreement.

On January 15, 1982, immediately after the first appointments from the eligibility list, plaintiffs brought this class action. They alleged that DOCS, CSC, and their high officers had engaged in unlawful discrimination against blacks and hispanics in the development and administration of Exam 36-808 and in the use of the resulting eligibility list to make permanent promotional appointments to the position of Correction Lieutenant. Plaintiffs contended that Exam 36-808 was discriminatory because (1) it resulted in a disproportionately low number of minority appointments and (2) it was not job-related. The complaint sought an injunction against the continued use by defendants of all racially discriminatory practices, damages in the form of back pay for alleged past discrimination, and other relief, including the development of non-discriminatory selection procedures for promotion and the implementation of steps to redress the discriminatory effects of Exam 36-808 and its resulting eligibility list.

In August 1982, following seven months of discovery proceedings and extensive settlement negotiations, the parties entered into a settlement agreement which contains two basic elements "to assure that minorities by reason of their race are not disadvantaged by the employment policies, procedures and practices within . . . [DOCS], and that any disadvantage to minorities which may have resulted from the use of Examination No. 36-808 is remedied as provided herein so that equal opportunity will be provided for all." Settlement Agreement art. I(7). First, it provides measures to adjust the current eligibility list to eradicate all disproportionate racial impact. Second, it provides for the development and administration of new selection procedures for promotion to Correction Lieutenant and Correction Captain which will be employed after the current eligibility list for Exam 36-808 has been exhausted.*fn5

1. Adjustment of the Current Eligibility List.

The agreement provides that all candidates who have received appointments from the eligibility list will retain their appointments and that appointments will continue until the list is fully exhausted, i.e., "until every eligible on the 36-808 List has been offered an appointment and has been afforded a reasonable opportunity to either accept or decline." Settlement Agreement art. VI(5)(c). The agreement seeks to eliminate the eligibility list's adverse impact on minorities by modifying its rank-ordering system. All candidates who passed Exam 36-808, including those candidates who have already been appointed, are to be placed into three zones based on their final test scores which, as discussed above, include seniority and veterans' credits.*fn6 Of the 225 appointments which had been made by September 29, 1982, most were offered to candidates who would place in the highest zone.*fn7

The agreement contains the following procedures to govern future promotions from the eligibility list.*fn8 All candidates falling within a single zone are to be deemed to be of equal fitness and will be ranked within their zone by random selection. Appointments will then be offered by rank order to those candidates in the highest unexhausted zone. However, these appointments will first be offered to minority candidates in this zone until minority appointments amount to 21% of all appointments made, a number approximately reflecting the percentage of minorities on the eligibility list.*fn9 Thereafter, appointments will be made in a ratio of 4 to 1, non-minority to minority, until the eligibility list is exhausted. In any event, no minority applicant in a lower zone will be eligible for appointment until appointments have been offered to all candidates, regardless of race, in the highest unexhausted zone. Finally, candidates will only be offered appointments to facilities or locations at which they have expressed a willingness to serve. If no minority candidate has designated the facility or location at which a vacancy occurs, the appointment will be offered to non-minority candidates notwithstanding the fact that the 21% ratio has not been achieved.

2. Future Promotional Procedures for Correction Lieutenant and Correction Captain.

The agreement also requires the parties to work toward the development of new selection procedures for promotion to Correction Lieutenant and Correction Captain which do not have an adverse racial impact and which are job-related. These procedures are to be employed after the current eligibility list is exhausted. The agreement requires defendants to "consider the possibility of alternatives or supplements to written examinations, including use of oral examination or assessment center techniques," Settlement Agreement art. VI(7)(c), but it does not mandate adoption of any specific approach. In short, the agreement suggests various procedures that have been used successfully in other situations to insure that future selection processes are not racially discriminatory.

C. The Proceedings in the District Court.

The settlement agreement was submitted to Judge Griesa on August 20, 1982 for approval pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 23(e). Pursuant to an order of Judge Griesa, due notice was given to members of the plaintiff class and to each candidate on the eligibility list who had not yet been appointed that objections would be heard on September 29, 1982. The notice included a summary of the settlement's terms and a statement that any DOCS employee could file objections to the settlement with the district court.

Two groups of non-class member/non-minority correctional officers appeared at the September 29, 1982 hearing and sought intervention. After hearing the proposed intervenors' objections to the settlement and their application for intervention, Judge Griesa, considering intervenors' application to be a request for permissive intervention under Fed. R. Civ. P. 24(b), ruled from the bench that "the intervenors are permitted to intervene for the sole purpose of objecting to the settlement . . . ." Judge Griesa stated that he was limiting the intervention primarily because the application was untimely. He found that intervenors had known of the action since its inception, and that although they were present at a July 14, 1982 conference at which the terms of the settlement were fully discussed, they did not then press for intervention and in fact appeared to favor the concepts and general terms of the settlement. Accordingly, Judge Griesa believed that it would be unfair to grant unlimited intervention because the parties "through hard work, careful thought and extensive negotiation" had decided "that there was no need for a trial and that there could be a settlement," while intervenors had taken no formal steps to intervene until after a settlement had been reached. He also noted that there was a "serious question" whether intervenors, even if granted unconditional intervention, would have sufficient standing beyond that enabling them to object to the settlement to require a full blown trial at which they would be permitted to defend the validity of Exam 36-808.

Additional hearings were held on October 4 and 14, and the parties and intervenors thereafter submitted briefs. On November 9, 1982, Judge Griesa issued an order approving the settlement on the grounds that it was "fair, reasonable and lawful in all respects" and that the intervenors' objections were "without merit." In his subsequent opinion of December 1, 1982, 552 F. Supp. 667, Judge Griesa wrote:

The present settlement agreement is not only justified by legal precedent, but is inherently reasonable and sound as a matter of policy. The benefits to plaintiff class of minority applicants inevitably result in some detriment to non-minority correctional officers competing for promotion to the rank of Lieutenant. However, the benefits to plaintiff class are modest and are carefully tailored to the precise problem raised by them in litigation. By the same token, the detriment to the non-minority applicants is also modest and is in fact considerably less than what might have occurred if ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.