Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Estate of Louis Yaeger v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue

decided: November 7, 1989.

ESTATE OF LOUIS YAEGER, DECEASED, JUDITH WINTERS, RALPH MEISELS, ABRAHAM K. WEBER, AND THE BANK OF NEW YORK, EXECUTORS, PETITIONERS-APPELLANTS, CROSS-APPELLEES,
v.
COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, RESPONDENT-APPELLEE, CROSS-APPELLANT



Appeal from an order dated February 2, 1989 in the United States Tax Court (Lawrence A. Wright, Judge) finding a deficiency in income tax due from the estate of Louis Yaeger for taxable years 1979 and 1980. Cross-appeal from an order of the tax court dated January 7, 1989 dismissing so much of the petition as related to tax year 1981.

Feinberg and Newman, Circuit Judges, and Mishler, Senior District Judge.*fn*

Author: Mishler

MISHLER, District Judge.

Petitioner appeals from a decision and order of the tax court, unofficially reported at 1988 Tax Ct. Memo LEXIS 292, T.C. Memo. 1988-264, 55 T.C.M. (CCH) 1101 (1988) (Wright, J.), that found that Louis Yaeger, deceased, was not in the trade or business of trading in securities and, therefore, that the interest he incurred in buying securities on margin was "investment interest" within the meaning of 26 U.S.C. section 163(d) and ordered that there is a deficiency due from the taxpayer for taxable years 1979 and 1980.*fn1 Respondent cross-appeals an unreported order of the tax court that granted the estate's motion to dismiss its petition for lack of jurisdiction as to the 1981 taxable year because the notice of deficiency set forth an incorrect taxable year.*fn2

We affirm the tax court's order that there is a deficiency due from the taxpayer for taxable years 1979 and 1980. We reverse the order that dismissed so much of the petition that referred to tax year ending December 31, 1981 for lack of jurisdiction and remand for a trial on the issue of Yaeger's tax liability for the portion of the 1981 tax year ending May 11, 1981.

I. TRADE OR BUSINESS OF TRADING IN SECURITIES

A. Background

The facts as stipulated and found by the tax court are not in dispute.*fn3 Yaeger graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Columbia University in 1921 having studied business and finance. Upon graduation he went to work as an accountant and subsequently became employed as an auditing agent for the Internal Revenue Service. He left this employ in 1923 and went to work as a bond salesman in New York City, eventually becoming an investment counselor.

Commencing in the mid-1920s, Yaeger began actively trading stocks and bonds on the stock market on his own account in addition to conducting his investment consulting business. In the 1940s, Yaeger gave up his investment consulting business because the management of his own account had grown so demanding. Thereafter, he devoted himself exclusively to trading on his own account, which was his sole occupation until the day he died.

Prior to 1979, Yaeger maintained accounts with several brokerage firms in New York, including H. Hentz & Co. His account at H. Hentz & Co. was the largest account that firm had maintained for a United States citizen. During the period between 1979 and his death, Yaeger maintained accounts with three brokerage firms and occasionally dealt with two others.

The following chart describes the trading activity in Yaeger's various accounts throughout the years in issue:

Number Number

Purchase Sales Shares Shares

Year Transactions Transactions Bought Sold

1979 1,176 86 1,453,555 822,955

1980 1,088 39 1,658,841 173,165

Yaeger maintained an office at H. Hentz & Co. from which he conducted most of his trading activity. For a brief period of time he also conducted his activity from another brokerage firm. H. Hentz & Co. provided Yaeger with an assistant, a telephone, use of the secretarial pool, and access to the research staff and facilities. Yaeger spent a full day at his office, researching investment opportunities and placing orders, and then returned home to read more financial reports late into the night. He worked every day of the week. When he was out of town, he maintained telephone contact with the brokers who handled his accounts. Yaeger was trading on the stock market the day before he died.

Yaeger subscribed to a distinct investment strategy. His trading strategy was to buy the stock of companies in which the stock prices were extremely undervalued and hold the stock until it reached a price that reflected the underlying value of the company. He rarely purchased "blue chip" stocks and many of the stocks he held did not pay dividends. Instead, Yaeger constantly looked for companies that were experiencing financial distress but whose underlying value was not recognized.

This strategy required thorough research that extended beyond the study of mainstream publications. He also poured over annual reports and brokerage house reports. Once Yaeger determined that the targeted company was experiencing temporary difficulties, he began to accumulate the stock. He would buy stock as it became available, although some of the stock was not frequently or actively traded and was difficult to acquire. He would initially buy small quantities of stock to avoid attracting attention from other investors. Once he obtained a sizeable amount of stock he would let his position be known. Yaeger took whatever steps he thought necessary to improve the ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.