Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

ZURICH AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY v. DAH SING BANK

June 15, 2004.

ZURICH AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY, Plaintiff,
v.
DAH SING BANK, LIMITED, UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA, THE BANK OF EAST ASIA LIMITED, and WAN KWOK PING, Defendants.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: DENISE COTE, District Judge

OPINION AND ORDER

This Opinion addresses whether there is personal jurisdiction in New York over a Hong Kong bank for accepting fraudulently endorsed checks for deposit, and whether the plaintiff has stated a claim against the American bank that assisted in the clearance of these checks. On December 18, 2003, defendant Dah Sing Bank, Limited ("Dah Sing") moved to dismiss the claims against it for lack of personal jurisdiction. On January 12, 2004, defendant Union Bank of California ("Union Bank") moved to dismiss the claims against it because (i) Dah Sing is an indispensable party with respect to the claims against Union Bank; (ii) Hong Kong is the most convenient forum for those claims and New York has no meaningful nexus to them; and (iii) plaintiff Zurich American Insurance Company ("Zurich") has failed to state a claim against Union Bank. For the reasons set forth below, the motions by Dah Sing and Union Bank for lack of personal jurisdiction and for failure to state a claim, respectively, are granted.

  Background

  The plaintiff, Dah Sing, and Union Bank have each submitted affidavits, declarations, and documents in connection with these motions.*fn1 The following is taken from the complaint and these submissions.*fn2 Complaint

  Zurich filed the original complaint in this diversity action*fn3 on October 2, 2003, and an amended complaint on November 25.*fn4 The amended complaint states that defendant Wan Kwok Ping ("Wan")*fn5 was an employee of Putnam, a New York corporation with its corporate offices in New York City. While Wan did not have check writing privileges and he was not a corporate officer of Putnam, he did deposit checks for Putnam, and he created account receivable folders for Putnam's customers. The amended complaint alleges that Wan fraudulently altered checks that he stole in New York that were made payable to Putnam by either (i) adding his own name to the payee line on a check, endorsing it, and depositing the check in his personal account maintained at The Bank of East Asia Limited ("BEA")*fn6 in New York, or (ii) endorsing the check in Putnam's name and depositing it in an "unauthorized corporate account" at Dah Sing in Hong Kong.*fn7 Beginning on or about March 2001 and continuing through March 2002, Wan allegedly converted approximately $175,000.*fn8

  The amended complaint asserts claims for conversion, money had and received, fraud, and unjust enrichment against Wan. The amended complaint asserts that Dah Sing, Union Bank, and BEA are each liable for conversion, money had and received, and negligence. The pleading does not identify the role played by Union Bank in the fraud. It merely asserts in conclusory fashion that the three bank defendants "accepted for deposit, forwarded for collection, cleared, collected and credited" the checks.

  Hong Kong Account

  Dah Sing has submitted evidence to show that Putnam does not and has never maintained an account at Dah Sing. The "corporate account" at Dah Sing to which the Amended Complaint refers is Account No. 11-303-1161-9 ("the "Hong Kong Account"), a checking account opened at Dah Sing's Johnston Road Branch in Hong Kong by Mr. Chui Man Kuen Fozwagz ("Chui") on or about April 25, 2001. The Hong Kong Account was opened in the name of Putnam Rolling Ladder Co. ("Putnam Co."), a sole proprietorship with its place of business in Hong Kong. The Company Account Opening Form submitted to Dah Sing to open the Hong Kong Account indicates that Chui is the sole proprietor of the company and the principal contact person for the Hong Kong Account.

  As part of the Hong Kong Account opening papers, Chui submitted to Dah Sing a Business Registration Certificate for his company showing the company to be registered to do business in Hong Kong with a Hong Kong business address. Dah Sing mailed monthly account statements for the Hong Kong Account to this address. These account statements were the only form of communication sent by Dah Sing regarding the Hong Kong Account. All deposits to the Hong Kong Account were made in person at Dah Sing's office in Hong Kong. Determination of the validity of the deposits at issue — i.e., that each check deposited was payable to Dah Sing's customer and properly endorsed — was made in Hong Kong. Only after the checks were accepted for deposit in accordance with Hong Kong banking laws were the checks forwarded to the United States for clearing and collection.

  On November 13, 2001, Chui submitted a Notification of Change of Signing Instructions form to Dah Sing authorizing either Chui or the individual defendant Wan to sign for the Hong Kong Account. Chui also submitted photocopies of Chui's and Wan's respective Hong Kong photo identification cards.

  Dah Sing

  Dah Sing has also submitted evidence to support the following. Dah Sing is a foreign corporation organized under the laws of Hong Kong and provides banking and financial services. Dah Sing operates through a series of branch offices located in Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New Territories and through a representative office in People's Republic of China. Dah Sing is not a state-owned bank. Neither Dah Sing nor its parent company, Dah Sing Financial Holdings Limited ("DSFH") is or represents itself to be an agency of a foreign state.

  Dah Sing is not registered or licensed to conduct business in the State of New York. It does not own any real property, lease property, or maintain any office or telephone number in New York. Dah Sing has no employees, representatives, directors or officers who live or work in New York, and has no agents located in New York to promote its interests. Neither does it have any subsidiaries or affiliates in New York or anywhere in the United States. Further, Dah Sing conducts no advertising or public relations, does not solicit business, and has no investor relations office in New York.

  While Dah Sing maintains correspondent bank relationships with banks in the United States for conducting U.S. dollar transactions on behalf of Dah Sing clients in Hong Kong, Dah Sing does not conduct any business transactions in New York or in the United States on its own behalf. With respect to U.S. checks that are deposited by its customers in Hong Kong, Dah Sing forwards the deposited checks to Union Bank in California for clearing and collection via the U.S. clearing system.

  Dah Sing has a website that provides information to potential customers and offers current customers the ability to conduct certain banking transactions over the internet. Part of Dah Sing's internet services includes the issuance of a PIN (Personal Identification Number) that provides online access to those services and provides existing customers with the ability to perform limited banking transactions over the Internet. A Dah Sing savings, checking, or deposit bank account can only be opened by visiting one of the bank's branches in Hong Kong. While customers may obtain information about, and download certain loan and credit card application forms from Dah Sing's website, such applications cannot be processed without the customer visiting one of Dah Sing's branches in Hong Kong. Dah Sing asserts that it has only issued credit cards to Hong Kong-based customers.

  The "iBanking" feature on Dah Sing's website only allows the bank's corporate customers based in Hong Kong to perform limited banking services over the internet. To date, no U.S.-based customer has made use of Dah Sing's iBanking services. Dah Sing has never mailed any software or materials relating to its iBanking service to any U.S.-based customer.

  The Doherty Affidavit asserts that Dah Sing offers corporate credit cards to multinational customers of the General Electric Company ("GE"). Under this agreement with GE, Dah Sing acts as a local issuer of corporate credit cards for companies operating in Hong Kong. According to an affidavit submitted by the Head of Bank Services for Dah Sing, however, the bank ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.