Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Almog v. Arab Bank

January 29, 2007

ORAN ALMOG, ET AL., PLAINTIFFS,
v.
ARAB BANK, PLC, DEFENDANT.
GILA AFRIAT-KURTZER, ET AL., PLAINTIFFS,
v.
ARAB BANK, PLC, DEFENDANT.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Gershon, United States District Judge

OPINION AND ORDER

More than 1,600 plaintiffs, consisting of United States and foreign nationals, bring claims for damages against Defendant Arab Bank, PLC, for knowingly providing banking and administrative services to various organizations identified by the U.S. government as terrorist organizations, that sponsored suicide bombings and other murderous attacks on innocent civilians in Israel.*fn1 The U.S. nationals assert claims under the Anti-Terrorism Act ("ATA"), 18 U.S.C.§§ 2331 et seq., essentially identical to those brought in Linde v. Arab Bank, 04-CV-02799, Litle v. Arab Bank, 04-CV-05449, and Coulter v. Arab Bank, 05-CV-00365, which were addressed in Linde v. Arab Bank, PLC,384 F. Supp. 2d 571 (E.D.N.Y. 2005) ("Arab Bank I").*fn2 The foreign nationals make similar factual allegations, but assert violations of the law of nations and base jurisdiction on the Alien Tort Claims Act ("ATS"), 28 U.S.C. § 1350.*fn3 Both the U.S. nationals and the foreign nationals also assert federal common law claims, namely, assisting in the intentional injury of others, reckless disregard of injury to others, wrongful death, survival, and negligent and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Defendant moves to dismiss the amended complaints for lack of subject matter jurisdiction, pursuant to Rule 12(b)(1) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and for failure to state a claim, pursuant to Rule 12(b)(6) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

FACTUAL ALLEGATIONS AND CLAIMS

Plaintiffs allege that, since the formation of Israel in 1948, Palestinian paramilitary and terrorist organizations have sought to destroy it through, inter alia, the systematic murder of Jews and other civilians in Israel.*fn4 In December 1987, a collective Palestinian uprising, or intifada, erupted against Israel in the West Bank and in Gaza. In late September 2000, a second Palestinian intifada, or Al Aqsa Intifada or Intifada Al Quds (the "Second Intifada"), erupted after the collapse of peace negotiations between the State of Israel and the Palestinian Authority. Each intifada was characterized by systematic and widespread terror campaigns designed to kill Jews and Israelis, as well as to coerce the civilian population of Israel to cause Israel to cede territory to the Palestinians and ultimately to destroy the Jewish state. With the outbreak of the Second Intifada, several terrorist organizations intensified the terror campaign of widespread and systematic suicide bombings and other murderous attacks in Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip, resulting in the death and injury of thousands of individuals, the majority of which were innocent civilians.

Plaintiffs identify the Islamic Resistance Movement ("HAMAS"), the Palestinian Islamic Jihad ("PIJ"), the Al Aqsa Martyrs' Brigade ("AAMB"), and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine ("PFLP") (collectively "the terrorist organizations") as prominent terrorist organizations in the Second Intifada, operating in Palestinian-controlled territory and acting with the united purpose of eradicating the State of Israel through a campaign of terror, genocide, and crimes against humanity. HAMAS was named a Specially Designated Terrorist entity ("SDT") by the U.S. government in 1995 and designated a Foreign Terrorist Organization ("FTO") by the U.S. Secretary of State in 1997. The PIJ was named as an SDT in 1995 and designated an FTO by the U.S. Secretary of State in 1997. The PFLP was named an SDT in 1995 and an FTO in 1997. Finally, HAMAS, the PIJ, and the AAMB were each designated a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Entity ("SDGT"). Plaintiffs allege that these terrorist organizations openly adhere to a shared mission, "to topple and eradicate the State of Israel, murder or throw out the Jews, and liberate the area by replacing it with an Islamic and/or Palestine state . . . ." The terrorist organizations seek to accomplish their shared goal by cooperating in the planning and commission of suicide bombings and other murderous attacks and by providing financial support to the relatives of "martyrs" and those injured in or imprisoned for perpetrating attacks. This has resulted in the systematic and continuous killing and injury of thousands of unarmed innocent civilians in Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip.

Plaintiffs allege that several purported charitable organizations, including the Popular Committee for Support of the Intifada (the "Popular Committee"), the Coalition of Benevolence (the "Coalition"), the Humanitarian Relief Association (the "HRA"), the Al-Ansar Society, and the Tulkarem Charitable Committee, are in fact front organizations for the terrorist organizations and act as fund-raising apparatuses that raise and launder funds to subsidize the Second Intifada and to bankroll the terrorist organizations. Plaintiffs allege that two specific committees were created in Saudi Arabia to raise funds to aid in the proliferation of the objectives of HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP: (1) the Popular Committee for Assisting the Palestinian Mujahideen (the "Mujahideen Committee"); and (2) in 2002, the Saudi Committee for Aid to the Al-Quds Intifada (the "Saudi Committee"). These two organizations set up accounts labeled "Account 98" accounts at various banks in Saudi Arabia, including the Arab National Bank (of which defendant Arab Bank owns a 40% interest), to raise funds for the families of "martyrs" of HAMAS, the AAMB, the PIJ, and the PFLP. In addition, public and private donations were deposited in numerous accounts established in various financial institutions in the Middle East, primary among them Arab Bank, for the explicit purpose of providing funds to families of "martyrs" of HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP.

According to the amended complaints, Arab Bank "knowingly and intentionally, both directly and indirectly, aided and abetted and intentionally facilitated the attacks by HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP by soliciting, collecting, transmitting, disbursing and providing the financial resources that allowed those organizations to flourish and to engage in a campaign of terror, genocide, and crimes against humanity in an attempt to eradicate the Israeli presence from the Middle East landscape." According to plaintiffs, Arab Bank is one of the largest financial institutions in the Middle East and is headquartered in Jordan. It operates through various sister institutions, subsidiaries, and affiliates, which collectively make up the Arab Bank Group. To this end, Arab Bank owns a 40% interest in Saudi Arabia's Arab National Bank. Arab Bank has over 400 branch offices in over twenty-five countries, including branches located in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and the United States. Its U.S. branch, located in New York, provides financial services that include clearing and correspondent banking services to its foreign bank branches, affiliated banking institutions (those that are owned or controlled by Arab Bank Group), and other foreign banks.

Plaintiffs allege that Arab Bank was part of a formalized system of financing that HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP rely upon to plan, fund, and carry out the suicide bombings and other murderous attacks. Specifically, plaintiffs allege that Arab Bank materially supported the efforts and goals of the terrorist organizations in two ways. First, Arab Bank provided banking services, including maintaining accounts, for HAMAS and other terrorist organizations. With respect to HAMAS specifically, plaintiffs allege that Arab Bank provided banking services to HAMAS directly by collecting funds into HAMAS accounts in its Beirut, Lebanon and Gaza Strip branches. Supporters knew to donate to HAMAS directly through Arab Bank because the HAMAS website directed supporters to make contributions to Arab Bank's Gaza Strip branch and because there were various advertisements publicized throughout the Middle East calling for donations to Arab Bank accounts. Arab Bank knew that the donations were being collected for terrorist attacks.

Plaintiffs also allege that Arab Bank maintained accounts and solicited and collected funds for the various charitable organizations, including the Popular Committee, organizations that are part of the Coalition, the HRA, the Al-Ansar Society and the Tulkarem Charitable Committee, all of which it knew are affiliated with the various terrorist organizations. In addition, plaintiffs allege that Arab Bank maintained accounts for individual supporters of terrorist organizations, such as HAMAS and al Qaeda. Arab Bank knew that the accounts of these various organizations and individuals were being used to fund the suicide bombings and other attacks sponsored by the terrorist organizations. Finally, Arab Bank laundered funds for the terrorist and front organizations, including the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development ("HLF"), which raised funds for HAMAS in the United States.

Plaintiffs' second factual theory is that Arab Bank administered the financial infrastructure by which the Saudi Committee distributed a comprehensive benefit of $5,316.06 to designated families of Palestinian "martyrs" and those wounded or imprisoned in perpetrating terrorist attacks. Despite its knowledge that the Saudi Committee was distributing this benefit to families of "martyrs," Arab Bank essentially served as a "paymaster" through its branch offices within the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Plaintiffs allege that the Saudi Committee, as of November 2001, had paid millions of dollars to suicide bombers or their beneficiaries through Arab Bank. Additionally, Arab Bank has transmitted millions of dollars to, among others, various institutions and individuals on behalf of the Saudi Committee.

According to plaintiffs' allegations, Arab Bank played an integral role in the structured financial process by which the funds in the "Account 98" accounts were transferred to their intended beneficiaries. The first step was to create and maintain a database of persons eligible to receive payments. To accomplish that, the Saudi Committee prepared a list of potential beneficiaries, including the families of "martyrs" and of prisoners. After verifying the names of the beneficiaries, their contact information, and their injury with Palestinian officials, the Saudi Committee coordinated with Arab Bank. Specifically, the Saudi Committee consulted with Arab Bank and local representatives of HAMAS to finalize the lists of beneficiaries.

The next step, as alleged by plaintiffs, was to transfer the funds contained in the "Account 98" accounts in the various banks to accounts at Arab Bank for the beneficiaries. The Saudi Committee opened an account at Arab Bank in the beneficiary's name and deposited a standard amount of U.S. dollars or Saudi Riyals into the account. Because Saudi Riyals cannot be conveniently converted to Israeli currency, Arab Bank facilitated that conversion by routing those funds through its New York branch, where they were converted to U.S. dollars and then to Israeli currency. Thus, "Account 98" funds "often, if not always," went through Arab Bank's branch in New York before being transferred to accounts in the Middle East.

Plaintiffs allege that, after the funds were transferred to designated accounts in the Arab Bank branches in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, Arab Bank distributed the money to beneficiaries with appropriate documentation. To ensure that only families of bona fide "martyrs" received disbursements, the Saudi Committee required beneficiaries to present registration cards to Arab Bank to receive remittances. The registration card was an official certification from the Palestinian Authority establishing the bona fides of the "martyr." Arab Bank allegedly provided instructions to the general public on how to qualify and collect money. Thus, plaintiffs claim that Arab Bank not only disbursed the funds to the beneficiaries, but also participated in the formalized process that required the families of "martyrs" to obtain official certification of their deceased relatives' status as bona fide "martyrs."

According to plaintiffs, the Saudi Committee paid and transmitted benefits to approximately 200 fallen "martyrs" through the program administered by Arab Bank in the first year of its existence alone. They also allege that the Saudi Committee openly declared that its funds were transmitted and distributed to the families of "martyrs" through Arab Bank. Plaintiffs allege that there is a direct correlation between the number of attacks, including suicide bombings, and the amount of funds held by the Mujahideen and Saudi Committees. Plaintiffs allege that the payment and promise of payment to families of "martyrs" incentivized and encouraged potential suicide bombers. Thus, plaintiffs allege that Arab Bank facilitated and provided an incentive for the suicide bombings and other murderous attacks in that the individual attackers knew that, if they committed an attack, their families would be supported by the funds held in their names by Arab Bank.

Each plaintiff alleges that he or she is a victim, or family member of a victim, of the actions of suicide bombers and murderers who were supported, encouraged, and enticed by funds collected and disbursed by Arab Bank. In their amended complaints, plaintiffs provide the names of various suicide bombers and gunmen whose families received payment through the financing process described above and whose attacks caused the injuries or deaths which are the subject of these suits. While the allegations of each plaintiff are unique, to summarize each plaintiffs' allegations would be impractical given the number of plaintiffs; thus, this opinion will summarize only the allegations of a few representative individuals from each of the amended complaints.

The following allegations are from the Almog amended complaint:

On February 22, 2004, an AAMB suicide bombing of a bus in Jerusalem killed eight people and injured over sixty others, including family members of plaintiffs who are Iraqi, Moroccan, and Israeli citizens.

On October 4, 2003, a PIJ suicide bombing at the Maxim Restaurant in Haifa killed twenty-one people, including family members of plaintiffs who are Israeli and U.S. citizens.

On May 19, 2003, a PIJ suicide bombing at the Amakim Mall in Afula, killed three and wounded seventy people, including family members of plaintiffs who are Ukranian and Israeli citizens.

On April 30, 2003, a suicide bombing in a beach-side pub in Tel Aviv killed two and injured over fifty people, including family members of plaintiffs who are United States, French, Israeli, United Kingdom, South African, Canadian, and Australian citizens.

On October 20, 2002, a HAMAS sniper shot and killed Keivan Chen, son of plaintiff Rahel Cohen, a citizen of Iran.

On December 1, 2001, two HAMAS suicide bombers detonated explosive devices in Jerusalem, killing eleven people, including family members of plaintiffs who are French and Israeli citizens.

On June 18, 2001, a HAMAS suicide bombing of a dance club in Tel Aviv killed and injured several youths, including family members of plaintiffs who are Russian, Israeli, Belarusian, Turkmenian, Uzbeki, and Ukranian citizens.

The allegations in the Afriat-Kurtzer amended complaint arise from a single suicide bombing on January 22, 1995, at the Beit Lid junction near Netanya. The PIJ claimed responsibility for the attack, which killed nineteen people and injured many others, whose family members are plaintiffs of Israeli, Argentinian, and U.S. citizenry.

Based on these allegations, both the Almog and Afriat-Kurtzer plaintiffs assert the following claims:*fn5 In Count One, the U.S. nationals claim that Arab Bank violated various provisions of the ATA.*fn6 Specifically, the U.S. nationals allege Arab Bank violated: (1) 18 U.S.C. § 2339A by providing material support, such as financial services, knowing or intending that such services would be used to carry out prohibited criminal acts; (2) 18 U.S.C. § 2339B(a)(1) by knowingly providing material support, such as financial services, to a terrorist organization; (3) 18 U.S.C. § 2339B(a)(2) by failing to retain possession of or maintain control over funds or report to the Secretary of the Treasury the existence of funds in which terrorist organizations had an interest when it became aware that it had possession of, or control over, such funds; and (4) 18 U.S.C. § 2339C by directly and indirectly collecting funds to finance terrorism.

In Count Two, the U.S. nationals allege that Arab Bank aided and abetted violations of the ATA by collecting and disbursing funds knowing they would be used to, inter alia, support, encourage, and reward terrorist activities in Israel, including suicide bombings and murder.

In Count Three, the foreign nationals claim that Arab Bank violated the law of nations by financing the suicide bombings and other murderous attacks directed at civilians committed by HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP. They further allege that Arab Bank aided and abetted and intentionally facilitated a violation of international law by providing funds to or collecting funds for HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP, intending or knowing that such funds would be used to carry out an offense under international law.

The foreign nationals allege in Count Four that Arab Bank aided and abetted, was complicit in, intentionally facilitated, and participated in a joint venture to engage in acts of genocide in violation of the law of nations by providing financial and other practical assistance, encouragement or moral support to HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP.

In Count Five, the foreign nationals claim that Arab Bank aided and abetted, was complicit in, intentionally facilitated, and participated in a joint venture to engage in the planning, preparation, or execution of crimes against humanity in violation of the law of nations by providing financial and other practical assistance, encouragement, or moral support to HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP.

The remainder of the Counts of both amended complaints allege various torts said to arise under federal common law. Specifically, Count Six alleges that Arab Bank assisted in the intentional injury of others by a third party by allowing its facilities to be used by HAMAS, the PIJ, the AAMB, and the PFLP in order to support and encourage suicide bombings and other murderous attacks; Count Seven alleges that Arab Bank recklessly disregarded injury to others; Count Eight alleges claims for wrongful death; Count Nine alleges "survival" claims; and Count Ten alleges claims for negligent and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

DISCUSSION

I. Pleading and Motion to Dismiss Standards

Under Rule 8(a) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, a pleading sets forth a claim for relief if it contains: (1) a short and plain statement of the grounds upon which the court's jurisdiction depends, (2) a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief, and (3) a demand for judgment for the relief the pleader seeks. Under this simplified pleading standard, a court should not dismiss a complaint unless no relief could be granted under any set of facts that could be proved consistent with the complaint. Swierkiewicz v. Sorema N.A., 534 U.S. 506, 514 (2002). When considering a motion to dismiss pursuant to Rule 12(b)(6) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure for failure to state a claim upon which relief can be granted, the court must accept the factual allegations set forth in the complaint as true and draw all reasonable inferences in favor of the plaintiff. Cleveland v. Caplaw Enters., 448 F.3d 518, 521 (2d Cir. 2006). On the issue of subject matter jurisdiction, the court may look beyond the pleadings in determining international law. Flores v. S. Peru Copper Corp., 414 F.3d 233, 255 n.30 (2d Cir. 2003). When reviewing a motion to dismiss under both Rule 12(b)(1) and Rule 12(b)(6), a court should decide the jurisdictional question first. Rhulen Agency, Inc. v. Alabama Ins. Guar. Ass'n, 896 F.2d 674, 678 (2d Cir. 1990).

II. Anti-Terrorism Act Claims

A. Brief Background of the ATA

There have been a series of acts of Congress each entitled the "Anti-Terrorism Act." The first Anti-Terrorism Act was enacted in 1987. See Pub. L. No. 100-204, §§ 1001-1005, 101 Stat. 1406 (1987). The ATA of 1987 contained Congressional findings and determinations, including the determination that the Palestine Liberation Organization ("PLO") is a terrorist organization. Id. § 1002. The first ATA also enacted 22 U.S.C. § 5202, which prohibits certain actions with regard to the PLO. Id. § 1003.

The second Anti-Terrorism Act was enacted in 1990, and it created several terrorism-related provisions, as well as re-designating § 2331 of Title 18 of the U.S. Code to § 2332. See Pub. L. No. 101-519, § 132, 104 Stat. 2240, 2250 (1990). The newly-redesignated § 2332 provided for criminal penalties for conduct occurring outside the United States that harmed, either by death or serious bodily injury, U.S. nationals. Id. The newly-enacted § 2331 provided definitions for various terms as used in that particular chapter of Title 18. Id. The other sections of the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1990, §§ 2333-2338 (excluding sections 2332a-h), provided, inter alia, U.S. nationals with civil remedies for acts of international terrorism, the district courts with jurisdiction, and a statute of limitations period for civil claims. Id.

In 1991, the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1990 was repealed in its entirety. See Pub. L. No. 102-27, § 402, 105 Stat. 130, 155 (1991), as amended, Military Construction Appropriations Act, Pub. L. No. 102-136, § 126, 105 Stat. 637, 643 (1991) (stating that "[e]ffective November 5, 1990, chapter 113A of title 18, United States Code, is amended to read as if section 132 of Public Law 101-519 [the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1990] had not been enacted"). The substantive provisions of the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1990 were reenacted in 1992. See Federal Courts Administration Act of 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-572, § 1003, 106 Stat. 4506, 4521-24 (1992). Although the substance of the provisions remained virtually unchanged, the newly-enacted public law did not designate a short title, previously the Anti-Terrorism Act, for the collection of provisions.*fn7 The terrorism-related provisions, as reenacted, are codified in §§ 2331-2338 of chapter 113B of Title 18 of the U.S. Code (excluding sections 2332a-h). The remainder of the sections of Chapter 113B of Title 18 of the U.S. Code, §§ 2332a-h and §§ 2339-2339D, which also relate to terrorism, were enacted by various other laws, including the Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act ("AEDPA"), Pub. L. No. 104-132, 110 Stat. 1214 (1996), and the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 ("USA PATRIOT Act"), Pub. L. No. 107-56, 115 Stat. 272 (2001).*fn8

B. Anti-Terrorism Act Claims

Arab Bank moves to dismiss the claims of the U.S. nationals brought under the ATA on essentially the same grounds raised in Arab Bank I.*fn9 For the reasons stated in the opinion in that case, Arab Bank's motion to dismiss the ATA claims is denied in part and granted in part.

Like the plaintiffs in Arab Bank I, the current plaintiffs bring their suit pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 2333, which provides that any U.S. national may sue for an injury sustained "by reason of an act of international terrorism." 18 U.S.C. § 2333(a). "International terrorism" is defined as activities that:

(A) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State, or that would be a criminal violation if committed within the jurisdiction of the United States or of any State;

(B) appear to be intended--(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;

(ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or

(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination or kidnapping; and

(C) occur primarily outside the territorial jurisdiction of the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to intimidate or coerce, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum[.]

18 U.S.C. § 2331(1).

Plaintiffs allege that Arab Bank violated: (1) 18 U.S.C. § 2339A by providing material support or resources to terrorists;*fn10 (2) 18 U.S.C. § 2339B(a)(1) by providing material support to foreign terrorist organizations;*fn11 (3) 18 U.S.C. § 2339B(a)(2) by failing to retain possession of or maintain control over funds or report to the Secretary of Treasury the existence of funds in which terrorist organizations had an interest when it became aware that it had possession of, or control over, such funds;*fn12 and (4) 18 U.S.C. § 2339C by financing terrorism.*fn13 As described in Arab Bank I, violations of Sections 2339A, 2339B(a)(1), and 2339C can serve as predicate crimes giving rise to liability under the ATA. See Arab Bank I, 384 F. Supp. 2d at 580-81 (citing Boim v. Quranic Literacy Inst. and Holy Land Found. For Relief And Dev., 291 F.3d 1000, 1014-15 (7th Cir. 2002)). Thus, for the reasons stated in Arab Bank I with respect to those claims, plaintiffs have sufficiently alleged that they were injured by reason of an act of international terrorism. However, plaintiffs' claims under § 2339B(a)(2) "are neither criminal violations nor acts of international terrorism, as defined by the statute" and must therefore be dismissed. See id. at 590 (stating that "this claim is an attempt to recast civil violations of the reporting requirements as criminal acts of providing material support").

Civil aiding and abetting liability, as well as conspiracy liability, is available under the ATA, and Arab Bank's alleged conduct falls within the scope of such liability. Id. at 582-85 (citing Boim, 291 F.3d at 1018-21 and Halberstam v. Welch, 705 F.2d 472, 488-89 (D.C. Cir. 1983)). With respect to conspiracy, plaintiffs adequately allege that Arab Bank knowingly and intentionally provided services to organizations it knew to be terrorist organizations and that they were injured by an overt act which was committed in furtherance of the common scheme. Arab Bank and the terrorist organizations were participants in a common plan under which Arab Bank supplied necessary financial services to the organizations and administered the "martyr" benefit plan. These allegations support not only the existence of an agreement, but also Arab Bank's knowing and intentional participation in the agreement's illegal goals. See id. at 584. With respect to aiding and abetting liability, the financial services provided by Arab Bank, and the administration of the benefit plan, are alleged to have provided substantial assistance to international terrorism and encouraged terrorists to act. See id. Thus, Arab Bank's alleged conduct is a sufficient basis for liability under the broad scope of the ATA.

Finally, plaintiffs' allegations are sufficient with respect to Arab Bank's knowledge and intent. See id. at585-87. None of the provisions of the ATA imposes a heightened pleading standard, nor do any require that Arab Bank have had the specific intent to cause the specific acts which injured plaintiffs. See Arab Bank I,384 F. Supp. 2d at 585-86. It is sufficient that Arab Bank played a role in a well-publicized plan to reward terrorists killed and injured in suicide bombings and other attacks in Israel; knew that the groups to which it provided services were engaged in terrorist activities; and knew that the funds it received as deposits and transmitted to various organizations were to be used for conducting acts of international terrorism. See id. at 588.

In conclusion, as in Arab Bank I, the claims in Count One of both the Almog and AfriatKurtzer amended complaints alleging violations of 18 U.S.C. § 2339B(a)(2) (failure to retain funds and to report the existence of certain funds) are dismissed. See id.at 589-90. The motion to dismiss is denied as to all other ATA claims in Counts One and Two pursuant to the reasoning in Arab Bank I.*fn14

III. Alien Tort Claims Act Claims

The ATS provides that "[t]he district courts shall have original jurisdiction of any civil action by an alien for a tort only, committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States." 28 U.S.C. ยง 1350. On its face, the statute requires that plaintiffs must 1) be aliens, 2) claiming damages for a tort only, 3) resulting from a violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States. Flores, 414 F.3d at 242.Arab Bank moves to dismiss the claims of the foreign nationals brought under the ATS, arguing that this court lacks jurisdiction and that plaintiffs have failed to state a claim because plaintiffs have failed to plead a violation of the law of nations. Neither the Almog nor the Afriat-Kurtzer plaintiffs assert that the torts they allege are in violation of a treaty of the United States; rather, they assert a violation of the law of nations.The essential issues ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.