Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Official citation and/or docket number and footnotes (if any) for this case available with purchase.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Gregory v. Academy Collection Service

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK


July 2, 2009

MICHAEL GREGORY, PLAINTIFF,
v.
ACADEMY COLLECTION SERVICE, INC., DEFENDANT.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: James Orenstein, Magistrate Judge

MEMORANDUM AND ORDER

Attorney David Israel ("Israel") is an attorney admitted to practice in the state of Louisiana. He is not admitted to practice before this court. Israel has applied to be admitted pro hac vice on behalf of the defendant in the instant case pursuant to Local Civil Rule 1.3(c).

Docket Entry 7. For the reasons set forth below, I deny the motion without prejudice to renewal upon a showing that such admission is appropriate under the circumstances.

Israel practices law in Louisiana where he is a member of the firm Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel, L.L.P. Israel has been admitted pro hac vice in at least eighteen cases in this district since September 2004.*fn1 It appears that Israel regularly engages in the practice of law in this district.*fn2 Yet by routinely gaining admission pro hac vice rather than taking the steps necessary to join the bar of this court, Israel remains immune to much of the disciplinary oversight to which his colleagues are subjected. See Loc. Civ. R. 1.5(b)-(c).

This court routinely grants attorneys who practice elsewhere the courtesy of representing clients who find themselves involved in litigation in this court. But "[a]dmission pro hac vice is by definition, at most, admission for a single proceeding." In re Rappaport, 558 F.2d 87, 88 n.1 (2d Cir. 1977). It is a privilege rather than a right, see Leis v. Flynt, 439 U.S. 438, 441-42 (1979), and one that should not be abused. If Israel intends to continue representing clients in this court, he can and should secure the admission to our bar. If, on the other hand, Israel can demonstrate that his many applications for admission pro hac vice represent an aberration in his normal practice, and that he does not anticipate making future similar applications on a routine basis, then I will of course grant him the same courtesy that is routinely afforded to out-of-state counsel in their occasional visits to this district.

SO ORDERED.

JAMES ORENSTEIN U.S. Magistrate Judge


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Official citation and/or docket number and footnotes (if any) for this case available with purchase.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.