Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Official citation and/or docket number and footnotes (if any) for this case available with purchase.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Mati Salomon, Plaintiff-Respondent v. Jaspal Singh

New York Supreme and/or Appellate Courts Appellate Division, First Department


April 2, 2013

MATI SALOMON, PLAINTIFF-RESPONDENT,
v.
JASPAL SINGH, ET AL., DEFENDANTS, HLATUN MINSWE, ET AL., DEFENDANTS-APPELLANTS.

Salomon v Singh

Published by New York State Law Reporting Bureau pursuant to Judiciary Law § 431.

This opinion is uncorrected and subject to revision before publication in the Official Reports.

Decided on April 2, 2013 Friedman, J.P., Sweeny, Renwick, Richter, Roman, JJ.

Order, Supreme Court, New York County (George J. Silver, J.), entered April 9, 2012, which, insofar as appealed from as limited by the briefs, denied the cross motion of defendants Hlatun Minswe and Maung Y. Mon for summary judgment dismissing plaintiff's claims of serious injury under the "permanent consequential limitation of use" and "significant limitation of use" categories of Insurance Law § 5102(d), unanimously affirmed, without costs.

Defendants established that plaintiff did not suffer a serious injury to his cervical spine by submitting the affirmed reports of their orthopedist and neurologist. Each physician examined plaintiff and found full range of motion in all planes (see Bailey v Islam, 99 AD3d 633 [1st Dept 2012]; Rosa v Mejia, 95 AD3d 402, 403 [1st Dept 2012]). In opposition, plaintiff raised a triable issue of fact by submitting an affirmed report of a radiologist who opined that an MRI of plaintiff's cervical spine taken shortly after the accident revealed a herniated disc, and affirmed medical reports finding that tests conducted, both shortly after the accident and recently, revealed limitations in cervical spine range of motion (see Pindo v Lenis, 99 AD3d 586 [1st Dept 2012]).

On the issue of causation, defendants' medical experts' passing reference to medical conditions that plaintiff experienced several years prior to the subject accident did not meet defendants' prima facie burden. The experts did not review any medical records related to plaintiff's prior treatment and expressed no opinion as to whether such conditions would "interrupt the chain of causation between the accident and claimed injury" (Pommells v Perez, 4 NY3d 566, 572 [2005]; see Bray v Rosas, 29 AD3d 422, 423-424 [1st Dept 2006]). Further, plaintiff's treating physcian opined that the cervical injury was caused by the accident, based on plaintiff's lack of previous symptoms and the onset of pain after the accident (see Perl v Meher, 18 NY3d 208, 219 [2011]).

THIS CONSTITUTES THE DECISION AND ORDER OF THE SUPREME COURT, APPELLATE DIVISION, FIRST DEPARTMENT.

ENTERED: APRIL 2, 2013

CLERK

20130402

© 1992-2013 VersusLaw Inc.



Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Official citation and/or docket number and footnotes (if any) for this case available with purchase.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.