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Collins v. Caron

United States District Court, N.D. New York

January 27, 2014

JEFFREY COLLINS, Plaintiff,
v.
SERGEANT CARON, Upstate Corr. Facility; MARSH, Corr. Officer, Upstate Corr. Facility; J. McGAW, Corr. Officer, Upstate Corr. Facility; and JOHN DOE, Corr. Officer, Upstate Corr. Facility, Defendants.

NIXON PEABODY LLP, DANIEL J. HURTEAU, ESQ., Pro Bono Trial Counsel for Plaintiff Albany, New York.

HON. ERIC T. SCHNEIDERMAN, Attorney General for the State of New York, LAURA A. SPRAGUE, ESQ., Assistant Attorney General, Albany, New York, Counsel for Defendants.

DECISION and ORDER

GLENN T. SUDDABY, District Judge.

An evidentiary hearing in this prisoner civil rights action, filed pro se by Jeffrey Collins ("Plaintiff") pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983, was held on October 29, 2013, before the undersigned. The hearing regarded the affirmative defense of the four above-described New York State correctional employees ("Defendants") that Plaintiff failed to exhaust his available administrative remedies, as required by the Prison Litigation Reform Act, before filing this action on December 9, 2010. At the two-hour-long hearing, documentary evidence was admitted. In addition, testimony was taken of Plaintiff as well as two defense witness (Upstate Correctional Facility Inmate Grievance Program Supervisor Scott Woodward, and New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Inmate Grievance Program Director Karen Bellamy) whom Plaintiff was able to cross-examine through an experienced pro bono trial counsel. At the conclusion of the hearing, the undersigned indicated that a written decision would follow. This is that written decision. For the reasons stated below, Plaintiff's Second Amended Complaint is dismissed without prejudice because of his failure to exhaust his available administrative remedies before filing this action.

I. RELEVANT LEGAL STANDARD

The Prison Litigation Reform Act of 1995 ("PLRA") requires that prisoners who bring suit in federal court must first exhaust their available administrative remedies: "No action shall be brought with respect to prison conditions under §1983... by a prisoner confined in any jail, prison, or other correctional facility until such administrative remedies as are available are exhausted." 42 U.S.C. § 1997e. The PLRA was enacted "to reduce the quantity and improve the quality of prisoner suits" by "afford[ing] corrections officials time and opportunity to address complaints internally before allowing the initiation of a federal case." Porter v. Nussle, 534 U.S. 516, 524-25 (2002). In this regard, exhaustion serves two major purposes. First, it protects "administrative agency authority" by giving the agency "an opportunity to correct its own mistakes with respect to the programs it administers before it is haled into federal court, and it discourages disregard of the agency's procedures." Woodford v. Ngo, 548 U.S. 81, 89 (2006). Second, exhaustion promotes efficiency because (a) "[c]laims generally can be resolved much more quickly and economically in proceedings before an agency than in litigation in federal court, " and (b) "even where a controversy survives administrative review, exhaustion of the administrative procedure may produce a useful record for subsequent judicial consideration." Woodford, 548 U.S. at 89.[1] "[T]he PLRA's exhaustion requirement applies to all inmate suits about prison life, whether they involve general circumstances or particular episodes, and whether they allege excessive force or some other wrong." Porter, 534 U.S. at 532.

In accordance with the PLRA, the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision ("DOCCS") has made available a well-established inmate grievance program. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.7. Generally, the DOCCS Inmate Grievance Program ("IGP") involves the following three-step procedure for the filing of grievances. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. §§ 701.5, 701.6(g), 701.7.[2] First, an inmate must file a complaint with the facility's IGP clerk within a certain number of days of the alleged occurrence.[3] If a grievance complaint form is not readily available, a complaint may be submitted on plain paper. A representative of the facility's inmate grievance resolution committee ("IGRC") has a certain number of days from receipt of the grievance to informally resolve the issue. If there is no such informal resolution, then the full IGRC conducts a hearing within a certain number of days of receipt of the grievance, and issues a written decision within a certain number of days of the conclusion of the hearing. Second, a grievant may appeal the IGRC decision to the facility's superintendent within a certain number of days of receipt of the IGRC's written decision. The superintendent is to issue a written decision within a certain number of days of receipt of the grievant's appeal. Third, a grievant may appeal to the central office review committee ("CORC") within a certain number of days of receipt of the superintendent's written decision. CORC is to render a written decision within a certain number of days of receipt of the appeal.

Moreover, there is an expedited process for the review of complaints of inmate harassment or other misconduct by corrections officers or prison employees. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.8. In the event the inmate seeks expedited review, he or she may report the misconduct to the employee's supervisor. The inmate then files a grievance under the normal procedures outlined above, but all grievances alleging employee misconduct are given a grievance number, and sent immediately to the superintendent for review. Under the regulations, the superintendent or his designee shall determine immediately whether the allegations, if true, would state a "bona fide" case of harassment, and if so, shall initiate an investigation of the complaint, either "in-house, " by the Inspector General's Office, or by the New York State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigations. An appeal of the adverse decision of the superintendent may be taken to the CORC as in the regular grievance procedure. A similar "special" procedure is provided for claims of discrimination against an inmate. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.9.

It is important to note that these procedural requirements contain several safeguards. For example, if an inmate could not file such a complaint within the required time period after the alleged occurrence, he or she could apply to the facility's IGP Supervisor for an exception to the time limit based on mitigating circumstances. If that application was denied, the inmate could file a complaint complaining that the application was wrongfully denied.[4] Moreover, any failure by the IGRC or the superintendent to timely respond to a grievance or first-level appeal, respectively, can-and must-be appealed to the next level, including CORC, to complete the grievance process. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.6(g)(2) ("Absent [an] extension, matters not decided within the time limits may be appealed to the next step.").[5]

In light of the plain language of 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.6(g)(2), the Second Circuit has indicated that the IGRC's nonresponse must be appealed to the superintendent even where the plaintiff's grievance was never assigned a grievance number.[6] Moreover, this point of law has been expressly recognized by district courts in the Northern District, [7] Southern District, [8] and Western District.[9] The Court notes that, if the plaintiff attaches to his appeal a copy of his grievance (or even if he adequately describes, in his appeal to the superintendent, the substance of that grievance), there is something for the superintendent to review.[10]

It is also important to note that DOCCS has a separate and distinct administrative appeal process for inmate misbehavior hearings:

A. For Tier III superintendent hearings, the appeal is to the Commissioner's designee, Donald Selsky, D.O.C.S. Director of Special Housing/Inmate Disciplinary Program, pursuant to 8 N.Y.C.R.R. § 254.8;
B. For Tier II disciplinary hearings, the appeal is to the facility superintendent pursuant to 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 253.8; and
C. For Tier I violation hearings, the appeal is to the facility superintendent or a designee pursuant to 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 252.6.

"An individual decision or disposition of any current or subsequent program or procedure having a written appeal mechanism which extends review to outside the facility shall be considered nongrievable." 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.3(e)(1). Similarly, "an individual decision or disposition resulting from a disciplinary proceeding... is not grievable." 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.3(e)(2). However, "[t]he policies, rules, and procedures of any program or procedure, including those above, are grievable." 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.3(e)(3); see also N.Y. Dep't Corr. Serv. Directive No. 4040.

Generally, if a prisoner has failed to properly follow each of the required three steps of the above-described grievance procedure prior to commencing litigation, he has failed to exhaust his administrative remedies, and his claims are subject to dismissal. Woodford, 548 U.S. at 93; Porter, 534 U.S. at 524; Ruggiero v. Cnty. of Orange, 467 F.3d 170, 175 (2d Cir. 2006). However, a plaintiff's failure to exhaust does not end the inquiry. The Second Circuit has held that a three-part inquiry is appropriate where a defendant contends that a prisoner has failed to exhaust his available administrative remedies, as required by the PLRA. Hemphill v. State of New York, 380 F.3d 680, 686, 691 (2d Cir. 2004), accord, Ruggiero, 467 F.3d at 175. First, "the court must ask whether [the] administrative remedies [not pursued by the prisoner] were in fact available' to the prisoner." Hemphill, 380 F.3d at 686 (citation omitted). Second, if those remedies were available, "the court should... inquire as to whether [some or all of] the defendants may have forfeited the affirmative defense of non-exhaustion by failing to raise or preserve it... or whether the defendants' own actions inhibiting the [prisoner's] exhaustion of remedies may estop one or more of the defendants from raising the plaintiff's failure to exhaust as a defense." Id. [citations omitted]. Third, if the remedies were available and some of the defendants did not forfeit, and were not estopped from raising, the non-exhaustion defense, "the Court should consider whether special circumstances' have been plausibly alleged that justify the prisoner's failure to comply with the administrative procedural requirements." Id. [citations and internal quotations omitted].

With regard to this third inquiry, the Court notes that, under certain circumstances, an inmate may exhaust his administrative remedies by raising his claim during a related disciplinary proceeding. Giano v. Goord, 380 F.3d 670, 678-79 (2d Cir. 2004); Johnson v. Testman, 380 F.3d 691, 697 (2d Cir. 2004).[11] However, in essence, the circumstances in question include instances in which (1) the inmate reasonably believed that his "only available remedy" was to raise his claim as part of a tier disciplinary hearing, [12] and (2) the inmate articulated and pursued his claim in the disciplinary proceeding in a manner that afforded prison officials the time and opportunity to thoroughly investigate that claim.[13] Some district courts have found the first requirement not present where (a) there was nothing objectively confusing about the DOCCS regulations governing the grievability of his claim, (b) the inmate was specifically informed that the claim in question was grievable, (c) the inmate separately pursued the proper grievance process by filing a grievance with the IGRC, (d) by initially alleging that he did appeal his claim to CORC (albeit without proof), the inmate has indicated that, during the time in question, he understood the correct procedure for exhaustion, and/or (e) before and after the incident in question, the inmate pursued similar claims through filing a grievance with the IGRC.[14] Other district courts have found the second requirement not present where (a) the inmate's mention of his claim during the disciplinary hearing was so insubstantial that prison officials did not subsequently investigate that claim, and/or (b) the inmate did not appeal his disciplinary hearing conviction.[15]

Finally, two additional points bear mentioning regarding exhaustion hearings. First, the Second Circuit has ruled that a plaintiff in a lawsuit governed by PLRA is not entitled to a jury trial on disputed factual issues relating to his exhaustion of administrative remedies; rather, PLRA exhaustion is a matter of judicial administration. Messa v. Goord, 652 F.3d 305, 308-10 (2d Cir. 2011). Second, given that non-exhaustion is an affirmative defense, the defendant bears the burden of showing that a prisoner has failed to exhaust his available administrative remedies.[16] However, once a defendant has adduced reliable evidence that administrative remedies were available to the plaintiff and that the plaintiff nevertheless failed to exhaust those administrative remedies, the plaintiff must then "counter" the defendant's assertion by showing exhaustion, unavailability, estoppel, or "special circumstances."[17] As a result, practically speaking, while the burden on this affirmative defense remains at all times on the defendant, the plaintiff may sometimes have to adduce evidence in order to defeat it.

II. ANALYSIS

A. Availability of Administrative Remedies

After carefully considering the evidence submitted at the exhaustion hearing, the Court finds that Plaintiff did not file a grievance regarding the assault alleged in this action, despite the fact that administrative remedies were available to Plaintiff during the time in question. The Court makes this finding for the following five reasons.

First, Defendants have adduced admissible evidence establishing that Plaintiff did not file a grievance regarding the assault alleged in this action, nor did he pursue any such grievance to CORC. ( See, e.g., Hrg. Tr. at 5, 12, 31-32, 34-36; Hrg. Exs. D-2, D-3; cf. Dkt. No. 8, at ¶ 53, 55-57, 60; Hrg. Exs. P-2, P-4, P-5, P-6.)

Second, Defendants have adduced admissible evidence establishing that, during the time in question, an inmate grievance program was in existence at Upstate Correctional Facility ("Upstate C.F."). (Hrg. Tr. at 5-11, 24; Hrg. Exs. D-1, D-2, D-4.)

Third, Defendants have adduced admissible evidence establishing that, during the time in question, Plaintiff was advised of Directive 4040 each time he was received at a correctional facility, had access to Directive 4040, and was aware of the inmate grievance program at Upstate C.F. (Hrg. Tr. at 41-42, 48-49, 54-55, 60-61, 63, 71-72; Hrg. Exs. D-3, D-4.) For example, Plaintiff filed grievances at Upstate C.F. on March 20, 2009, and April 1, 2009. (Hrg. Ex. D-3; Hrg. Tr. at 71-72.) Similarly, Plaintiff had filed grievances at another correctional facility on August 29, 2006, October 13, 2006, January 19, 2007, and February 18, 2009. (Hrg. Ex. D-3; Hrg. Tr. at 30-32, 54, 73.) Moreover, in his Verified Second Amended Complaint, Plaintiff swore that, during the time in question, he was aware of (1) the need to file a grievance, and (2) the office at Upstate C.F. to which to submit that grievance. (Dkt. No. 8, at ¶¶ 51-58.)

Fourth, Defendants have adduced admissible evidence establishing that the inmate grievance program at Upstate C.F. was working during the time in question. (Hrg. Tr. at 11-12, 38-41, 43-45; Hrg. Ex. D-2.) For example, on March 20, 2009, and April 1, 2009, Plaintiff filed grievances at Upstate C.F., which he subsequently pursued all the way to CORC. (Hrg. Ex. D-3; Hrg. Tr. at 71-72.) Indeed, between July 5, 2009, and July 20, 2009, forty-one other staff misconduct grievances were successfully filed at Upstate C.F. (Hrg. Ex. D-2; Hrg. Tr. at 11-12.)

Fifth, the Court finds the relevant portions of Plaintiff's hearing testimony (i.e., that he mailed grievances to the grievance office on July 6, 2009, July 16, 2009, and July 19, 2009, which were lost or destroyed during mailing or processing) to be incredible due to various admissions, omissions and/or inconsistencies in that testimony, and his demeanor during his testimony. (Hrg. Exs. P-1, P-2, P-3; Hrg. Tr. at 3-22, 47-80.)

B. Forfeiture/Estoppel

After carefully considering the evidence submitted at the exhaustion hearing, the Court finds that Defendants did not forfeit the affirmative defense of non-exhaustion by failing to raise or preserve it, or that Defendants are estopped from raising the defense by taking actions that inhibited Plaintiff's exhaustion of remedies.

With regard to the forfeiture issue, Defendant's Amended Answer asserted this affirmative defense, and Plaintiff's counsel made no argument regarding forfeiture at the hearing. (Dkt. No. 50, at ¶ 18; see generally Hr. Tr. 80-87.)

Moreover, Plaintiff failed to offer any credible evidence at the hearing that Defendant in any way interfered with Plaintiff's ability to file a grievance during the time in question. ( See, e.g., Hrg. Tr. at 51-52, 72-73.) A defendant in a prisoner civil rights action may not be estopped from asserting the affirmative defense of failure to exhaust administrative remedies (for purposes of the second part of the three-part inquiry established by the Second Circuit) based on the actions or inactions of other individuals. This point of law is clear from Second Circuit cases.[18] Furthermore, this point of law has been relied on by district courts in the Northern District, [19] Southern District, [20] Eastern District, [21] and Western District.[22]

The Court notes that a contrary interpretation of the second part of the Second Circuit's three-part exhaustion inquiry would turn the ancient doctrine of estoppel on its head, transforming it-in Orwellian fashion-into one of "vicarious estoppel." See Black's Law Dictionary at 629 (9th ed) (defining "estoppel" as "[a] bar that prevents one from asserting a claim or right that contradicts what one has said or done before...."). Moreover, such an invention would be wholly unnecessary: the vicarious conduct sought to be protected against is already protected against by the "special circumstances" inquiry established by the Second Circuit.

Finally, while it may be argued that such an interpretation of the doctrine of estoppel is nonetheless appropriate because the purpose of the PLRA is to enable the institution to resolve disputes efficiently rather than protect the individual, [23] prisoner civil rights suits are suits against prison officials in their individual capacities rather than suits against them in their official capacities (which would effectively be suits against the State and thus be barred by the Eleventh Amendment). As a result, the crux of the second part of the Second Circuit's three-part exhaustion inquiry is whether the officials may avail themselves of that defense, not whether the institution may avail itself of the defense.

C. Special Circumstances

After carefully considering the issue, the Court finds that there exists no special circumstances justifying Plaintiff's failure to comply with the administrative procedural requirements. Construed with the utmost of special leniency, Plaintiff's hearing testimony, and his counsel's cross-examination of Defendants' witness, raise the specter of four excuses for not having exhausted his available administrative remedies before he filed this action on December 9, 2009: (1) Plaintiff reasonably misunderstood the grievance process to permit him to appeal the non-processing of his grievances directly to CORC on July 28, 2009; (2) Plaintiff's letter of August 30, 2009, to the Superintendent of Elmira Correctional Facility ("Elmira C.F.") notifying him that Plaintiff "would like to have [his] appeal sent to" CORC completed the exhaustion process; (3) Plaintiff's contact with the Inspector General's Office in September of 2009 completed the exhaustion process; and (4) Plaintiff's initial exchange of correspondence with the office of the Superintendent of Upstate C.F. between July 5, 2009, and July 12, 2009, satisfied the pre-appeal exhaustion process.

With regard to Plaintiff's first excuse (i.e., that he reasonably misunderstood the grievance process to permit him to appeal the non-processing of his grievances directly to CORC), the Court finds that this excuse does not suffice for two alternative reasons: (1) he does not credibly argue that he misunderstood the need to first appeal to the facility superintendent; and (2) any such misunderstanding of the proper grievance process was not reasonable, given that (a) the language of 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.6(g)(2) clearly stated this part of the process, [24] (b) Plaintiff possessed copies of his grievances that he could have sent to the superintendent, and (c) by the time in question, Plaintiff had been incarcerated in the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision for some 16 years, and had filed numerous grievance appeals. ( See Hrg. Ex. D-3; Hrg. Tr. at 30-32, 47-80.) See also 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.6(g)(2) ("Absent [an] extension, matters not decided within the time limits may be appealed to the next step."). With regard to the first reason, the Court notes that, when asked why he wrote directly to CORC, Plaintiff responded vaguely as follows: "I found out through, you know, they got like organizations that tell you how to-how to go about things so they told me that if you don't receive responses, you should write directly to the IGP in Albany." (Hrg. Tr. at 59.) Plaintiff does not specify such details as what "organization" gave him this advice, or even that the advice regarded non-responses from inmate grievant offices rather than from superintendents. ( Id. ) With regard to the second reason, the Court notes that, for a misunderstanding of the law to constitute a special circumstance, that misunderstanding must be reasonable. [25]

With regard to Plaintiff's second excuse (i.e., that his letter of August 30, 2009, to the Superintendent of Elmira C.F. completed the exhaustion process), the Court finds that this excuse does not suffice for three alternative reasons: (a) the subject of the letter of August 30, 2009-i.e., the underlying grievance of August 10, 2009, which was submitted to the inmate grievance office at Upstate C.F.-was untimely and never accepted for filing by the grievance office at Upstate C.F.; (b) the rejection of the underlying grievance of August 10, 2009, at Upstate C.F. needed to be appealed to the Superintendent of Upstate C.F., not to the Superintendent of Elmira C.F.; and (c) Plaintiff never received a denial of his letter of August 30, 2009, nor filed an appeal from any such denial with CORC. (Hrg. Exs. P-6, P-8, P-9; Hrg. Tr. at 23-80.) With regard to the first reason, the Court notes, if exhaustion could be accomplished simply through appealing the denial of a request for leave to file an untimely grievance, then the time deadlines contained in the exhaustion process would lose all meaning. See Smith v. Kelly, 06-CV-0505, Decision and Order, at 21 (N.D.N.Y. filed Oct. 30, 2013) (Suddaby, J.) ("It would eviscerate the exhaustion requirement to deem an inmate to have exhausted his available administrative remedies where he files a grievance four-and-a-half years late..., then skips the superintendent and appeals the rejection of his grievance (based on untimeliness) to CORC, which never passes on the merits of his grievance. If exhaustion were permissible under such circumstances, every inmate could exhaust his available administrative remedies without fulfilling the functions of the exhaustion requirement...."). As the Supreme Court explained, "We are confident that the PLRA did not create such a toothless scheme." See Woodford v. Ngo, 548 U.S. 81, 95 (2006) (reversing Ninth Circuit decision holding that prisoner had exhausted his administrative remedies under the PLRA because none remained available to him after his grievance was rejected as untimely by state prison officials).

With regard to Plaintiff's third excuse (i.e., that his contact with the Inspector General's Office in September of 2009 completed the exhaustion process), the Court finds that this excuse does not suffice for two alternative reasons: (1) it does not appear that the investigation by the Inspector General was upon referral from either the Superintendent of Elmira C.F. or the Superintendent of Upstate C.F.; and (2) it does not appear that Plaintiff appealed a finding of unsubstantiation by the Inspector General's Office to CORC. (Hrg. Tr. at 68-80; Hrg. Ex. P-10.) Both of those things are required in order for an inmate's letter to an Inspector General's Office to complete the exhaustion process. Goodson v. Silver, 09-CV-0494, 2012 WL 4449937, at *4, 9 & n.7 (N.D.N.Y. Sept. 25, 2012) (Suddaby, J.) (collecting cases).

With regard to Plaintiff's fourth excuse (i.e., that his initial exchange of correspondence with Upstate C.F. Superintendent in early July 2009 initiated the exhaustion process), the Court finds that this excuse does not suffice for three alternative reasons: (1) an inmate's direct correspondence with the superintendent, bypassing the inmate grievance office, is not a grievance under the governing regulations (nor did that correspondence even contain a copy of his grievance);[26] (2) Plaintiff did not file an appeal (from the Superintendent's response) with CORC within seven days of receiving the response on July 12, 2009, as required by 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.5(a)(1); and (3) in Plaintiff's letter of July 28, 2009, to CORC, he did not attach, or even reference, either his letter of July 5, 2009, to the Superintendent or the Superintendent's response of July 12, 2009, despite possessing copies of both documents. (Hrg. Exs. D-4, D-5, P-4; Hrg. Tr. at 11, 16, 18, 20-21, 32-33, 52, 55, 57.) With regard to the first reason, it should be noted that the regulations clearly provide that, any grievances alleging staff misconduct must be filed under the normal procedure with the grievance office, which will then give the grievance a grievance number and send it immediately to the superintendent for review. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.8(a), (b). With regard to this third reason, it should be noted that the regulations clearly provide that, if possible, appeals to CORC shall contain, inter alia, both the underlying grievance and the superintendent's written response to the grievance. 7 N.Y.C.R.R. § 701.5(d)(1). It should also be noted that, during the time in question, Plaintiff knew how to file an appeal from the denial of a grievance by a superintendent, having done so at least six times. (Hrg. Ex. D-3; Hrg. Tr. at 30-32, 71-73.)

For all these reasons, the Court finds that Plaintiff's four proffered excuses-whether considered individually or together-do not constitute special circumstances justifying his failure to exhaust his available administrative remedies before filing this action. A procedure was available for Plaintiff to grieve the assault alleged in this action; and that procedure was made known to him; however, for whatever reason, he simply failed to follow it. Under the circumstances, the sound purposes of the exhaustion requirement ( see, supra, Part I of this Decision and Order) have been thwarted.

ACCORDINGLY, it is

ORDERED that Plaintiff's Second Amended Complaint (Dkt. No. 8) is DISMISSED in its entirety without prejudice for failure to exhaust his available administrative remedies before filing this action, pursuant to the PLRA; and it is further

ORDERED that the Clerk of the Court shall enter judgment for Defendants and close the file in this action.


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