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United States v. Maye

United States District Court, W.D. New York

April 8, 2014

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
v.
JOHN E. MAYE, Defendant.

DECISION AND ORDER

WILLIAM M. SKRETNY, Chief District Judge.

I. INTRODUCTION

On October 8, 2013, a jury convicted Defendant John E. Maye, M.D., of 33 counts of unlawful distribution and dispensation by a physician of a controlled substance, in violation of 21 U.S.C. § 841 (a)(1). Maye now moves for a judgment of acquittal under Rule 29 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure or, alternatively, for a new trial under Rule 33. For the reasons discussed below, Maye's motion is denied.

II. BACKGROUND

On April 29, 2010, a federal grand jury returned a 34-count Second Superseding Indictment against Maye. (Docket No. 82.) Count 1 charged Maye with conspiracy to distribute and dispense controlled substances other than for a legitimate medical purpose and not in the usual course of professional practice, in violation of 21 U.S.C. § 846. Counts 2-34 charged Maye with distributing and dispensing controlled substances other than for a legitimate medical purpose and not in the usual course of professional practice, in violation of 21 U.S.C. § 841 (a)(1).

Trial began on September 20, 2013, and concluded on October 8, 2013. Upon the close of the government's proof, this Court granted Maye's Rule 29 motion as to Count 1 and denied it as to the remaining counts in the indictment. (Docket No. 245.) The jury subsequently found Maye guilty on Counts 2-34. (Docket No. 252.) Following the verdict, Maye timely filed the instant motion for judgment of acquittal or, alternatively, for a new trial, on October 21, 2013. (Docket No. 261.)

III. DISCUSSION

A. Maye's Rule 29 Motion

1. Rule 29 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure

Under Rule 29 (a), a court must, upon a defendant's motion, "enter a judgment of acquittal of any offense for which the evidence is insufficient to sustain a conviction." A defendant may move for a judgment of acquittal after the government closes its evidence, after the close of all evidence, or after the jury has returned its verdict and been discharged. See Rule 29 (a) and (c)(1). A defendant may also renew a previously denied Rule 29 motion, so long as renewal occurs within 14 days after the guilty verdict or discharge of the jury, whichever is later. See Rule 29 (c)(1).

The making of a motion for a judgment of acquittal before the court submits the case to the jury is not a prerequisite for making such a motion after the jury is discharged. See Rule 29 (c)(3). "[W]hen a motion for judgment of acquittal made at the close of the government's case-in-chief is denied and a defendant presents a case, then the evidence put in by the defense will also be considered in deciding a [Rule 29] motion made after the trial ends." United States v. Truman , 762 F.Supp.2d 437, 445 (N.D.N.Y. 2011).

A defendant challenging the sufficiency of the evidence bears a heavy burden. United States v. Hassan , 578 F.3d 108, 126 (2d Cir. 2008); United States v. Finley , 245 F.3d 199, 202 (2d Cir. 2001). "In evaluating whether the evidence was sufficient to convict a defendant, [a reviewing court] consider[s] all of the evidence, both direct and circumstantial, in the light most favorable to the government, crediting every inference that the jury might have drawn in favor of the government.'" United States v. Velasquez , 271 F.3d 364, 370 (2d Cir. 2001) (quoting United States v. Walker , 191 F.3d 326, 333 (2d Cir. 1999)).

When considering the trial evidence, "the court must be careful to avoid usurping the role of the jury." United States v. Jackson , 335 F.3d 170, 180 (2d Cir. 2003). The court may not "substitute its own determination of... the weight of the evidence and the reasonable inferences to be drawn for that of the jury." United States v. Guadagna , 183 F.3d 122, 130 (2d Cir. 1999) (internal quotation marks and citations omitted). Determining the witnesses' credibility falls strictly within the province of the jury. Guadagna , 183 F.3d at 129 (noting that the court must defer to the jury even if the evidence would also support, in the court's opinion, a different result).

A judgment of acquittal is warranted only if the court concludes that the evidence is non-existent or so meager that no rational trier of fact could find the defendant guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Velasquez, 271 F.3d at 270; Guadagna , 183 F.3d at 130. The court must consider the evidence "in its totality, not in isolation, and the government need not negate every possible theory of innocence." United States v. Cote , ...


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