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United States v. Medina

United States District Court, S.D. New York

January 20, 2015

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
v.
ROBERT MEDINA, Defendant.

MEMORANDUM OPINION & ORDER

PAUL G. GARDEPHE, District Judge.

Indictment S3 13 Cr. 272 charges Defendant Robert Medina in Count One with conspiring to distribute, and to possess with intent to distribute, 280 grams or more of crack cocaine, and marijuana, in violation of 21 U.S.C. § 846; in Count Two, with using, carrying, and brandishing a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 924(c), on occasions other than the murder of Gary Clark on July 28, 2012; and in Count Three with using and carrying a firearm in connection with a drug trafficking crime on July 28, 2012, and causing the death of Gary Clark through use of that firearm, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 924(j).[1] (S3 Indictment (Dkt. No. 111))

Medina proceeded to trial on July 8, 2014. On July 25, 2014, the jury returned a verdict finding him guilty of conspiring to distribute or possess with intent to distribute marijuana, in violation of 21 U.S.C. § 846, and of using, carrying, and brandishing a firearm in connection with the charged drug trafficking conspiracy, as charged in Count Two, and in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(1)(A)(ii). (Verdict Form (Dkt. No. 197)) The jury returned a not guilty verdict on the Section 924(j) count, and also found that the Government had not demonstrated, by proof beyond a reasonable doubt, that Medina had participated in a conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine. (Id.) Pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 29, Medina has moved for a judgment of acquittal on Counts One and Two, arguing that the Government offered insufficient evidence that he participated in a conspiracy to distribute, or possess with intent to distribute, marijuana. (Dkt. No. 196) For the reasons set forth below, Medina's motion will be denied.

BACKGROUND

Medina's arrest arose from the New York City Police Department's investigation of two shootings in the Bronx on July 28, 2012. The first shooting took place at about 1:00 a.m. near 222nd Street and White Plains Road, and resulted in a non-fatal injury to a bystander outside Scotty Pump Ups Tavern. (Trial Tr. ("Tr.") at 801-08, 1258-59, 1273-77) The second shooting took place at about 5:00 a.m. near 228th Street and White Plains Road, and caused the death of Gary Clark. (Tr. 555-70, 808-10)

At trial, the Government alleged, inter alia, that in 2012 Medina and co-conspirator Ruben Estrada sold crack cocaine and marijuana together in the area of East 228th Street and White Plains Road in the Bronx. According to the Government, the July 28, 2012 shootings arose from a dispute over a drug debt between Medina and Estrada on the one hand, and another drug dealer - Gerod Jackson - on the other, who sold drugs with Gary Clark on a nearby block. (Tr. 1968-76) The Government argued at trial that - in the months leading up to July 28, 2012 - Medina repeatedly threatened Jackson, and assaulted him, in an attempt to collect money from Jackson for crack cocaine that Medina had supplied to Jackson to sell, but which Jackson had not paid for. (Tr. 1968-69, 1974) According to the Government, Clark and Jackson confronted Medina and Estrada in the early morning hours of July 28, 2012 in the vicinity of 718 East 228th Street in the Bronx; gunfire was exchanged, Estrada shot Clark, and Clark died as a result. (Tr. 1968-69)

DISCUSSION

I. LEGAL STANDARD

Under Fed. R. Crim. P. 29, a trial court "must enter a judgment of acquittal of any offense for which the evidence is insufficient to sustain a conviction." Fed. R. Crim. P. 29(a).

To prove Medina guilty of conspiracy to distribute or possess with intent to distribute marijuana, the Government was required to demonstrate, by proof beyond a reasonable doubt, that (1) in or about 2012, an agreement or understanding between two or more people existed to violate those provisions of the law that make it a crime to distribute marijuana or to possess marijuana with the intent to distribute it, and (2) Medina knowingly became a member of the charged conspiracy during the applicable time period. (Tr. 2147) To prove Medina guilty of violating Section 924(c), the Government was required to demonstrate, by proof beyond a reasonable doubt, that (1) in or about 2012, Medina committed a drug trafficking crime for which he might be prosecuted in a court of the United States - namely, the drug conspiracy charged in Count One - and (2) Medina knowingly used or carried a firearm during and in relation to the commission of, or knowingly possessed a firearm in furtherance of, the narcotics conspiracy, or aided and abetted such use, carrying or possession of a firearm by another. (Tr. 2165)

"In considering a motion for judgment of acquittal, the court must view the evidence presented in the light most favorable to the government, " and "[a]ll permissible inferences must be drawn in the government's favor." United States v. Guadagna, 183 F.3d 122, 129 (2d Cir. 1999). "[U]pon a motion for judgment of acquittal, the Court must determine whether upon the evidence, giving full play to the right of the jury to determine credibility, weigh the evidence, and draw justifiable inferences of fact, a reasonable mind might fairly conclude guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.'" Id . (quoting United States v. Mariani, 725 F.2d 862, 865 (2d Cir. 1984) (internal quotations omitted)). "The court should not substitute its own determination of the credibility of witnesses, the weight of the evidence and the reasonable inferences to be drawn for that of the jury." Mariani, 725 F.2d at 865. This is because "the task of choosing among competing, permissible inferences is for the fact-finder, not for the reviewing court." United States v. McDermott, 245 F.3d 133, 137 (2d Cir. 2001). "The Second Circuit has observed that [t]hese strict rules are necessary to avoid judicial usurpation of the jury function.'" United States v. DiPietro, No. S5 02 Cr. 1237 (SWK), 2005 WL 1863817, at *1 (S.D.N.Y. Aug. 5, 2005) (quoting Mariani, 725 F.2d at 865) (alterations in DiPietro). Given this standard, "[a] defendant bears a very heavy burden' in challenging a conviction based on insufficient evidence." United States v. Goldstein, No. S2 01 Cr. 880 (WHP), 2003 WL 1961577, at *1 (S.D.N.Y.Apr. 28, 2003) (quoting United States v. Brewer, 36 F.3d 266, 268 (2d Cir. 1994)).

II. ANALYSIS

Medina argues that the evidence at trial was insufficient to convict him of any conspiracy to distribute or possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance - whether crack cocaine or marijuana. Medina further argues that because there was insufficient evidence of the charged drug conspiracy, he is entitled to a judgment of acquittal on the Section 924(c) charge.[2] (Def. Br. (Dkt. No. 196) at 2-3)

The S3 Indictment charges Medina with conspiring with Estrada and John Jones to distribute or possess with intent to distribute controlled substances. (S3 Indictment (Dkt. No. 111) ¶ 2) The S3 Indictment alleges that Medina and co-defendant Estrada had agreed to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine base and marijuana (id. ¶ 3); while codefendant Jones had agreed to distribute and possess with intent to distribute only cocaine base. (Id. ¶ 4) Medina argues that - in light of Jones's testimony that he did not meet Estrada until July 28, 2012, and that he rejected Medina's offer to sell drugs with him and Estrada at that time - there was insufficient ...


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