Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Graham v. Criminal Court of City of New York

United States District Court, E.D. New York

February 2, 2015

JESSICA C. GRAHAM, Plaintiff,
v.
CRIMINAL COURT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, COUNTY OF RICHMOND; NEW YORK CITY ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN'S SERVICES; MARCELL MONROE; FAMILY COURT LEGAL SERVICES; JEFFREY BOND; ALAN SPUTZ; GLADYS GLADYS CARRION; DAWN UWANGUE; NEW YORK CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT 121ST PCT.; JOHN DOE 1; JOHN DOE 2; NEW YORK CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT 120TH PCT.; JOHN ADAMS; ANTHONY FERRETTI; KIM MURRAY; PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; RICHMOND COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE; DANIEL DONOVAN, JR.; NEW YORK CITY FAMILY COURT IN RICHMOND COUNTY; HELENE D. SACCO; ARNOLD LIM; KAREN WOLFF; LISA ASCHKENASY; ALISON HAMANJIAN; RALPH PORZIO; JODY BAHAR; IAN BERLINER; GEOFFREY LONG; BENJAMIN HABER; WILLIAM QUIRK; JAMES VELOUCE; NEW YORK CITY FAMILY COURT IN MANHATTAN COUNTY; EDWINA RICHARD-MENDELSON; SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK APPELLATE DIVISION SECOND DEPARTMENT; NEW YORK CITY COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS; JOHN DOE 3; JOHN DOE 4; FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION NEW YORK FIELD OFFICE, Defendants.

MEMORANDUM AND ORDER

PAMELA K. CHEN, District Judge.

On January 20, 2015, plaintiff Jessica C. Graham filed this pro se action against, inter alia, the Administration for Children's Services; Richmond County Family Court; Richmond County Criminal Court; and judges, court referees, and attorneys who are employed at the Richmond County Family Court, alleging constitutional violations arising out of her ongoing state court criminal and family court proceedings. The Court liberally construes her complaint as one brought pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983. The Court grants plaintiff's application to proceed in forma pauperis and denies plaintiff's request for the appointment of pro bono counsel. For the reasons discussed below, plaintiff's complaint is dismissed with prejudice.

BACKGROUND

This is the fourth action that plaintiff has brought in which she alleges a series of constitutional violations associated with underlying Richmond County Family Court proceedings. ( See Graham v. Quirk, 14-CV-5815 (PKC) (Dkt. 7 (order of partial dismissal dated December 8, 2014, dismissing all claims relating to the custody of plaintiff's child for lack of subject matter jurisdiction)); Graham v. Rawley, 14-CV-6022 (PKC) (Dkt. 6 (order dated October 27, 2014, dismissing all claims relating to custody of plaintiff's child as duplicative and for lack of subject matter jurisdiction, and transferring remaining claims to the District of New Jersey)); Graham v. Quirk, 14-CV-6676 (PKC) (Dkt. 6 (order dated December 22, 2014, dismissing with prejudice plaintiff's claims relating to the custody of her child for lack of subject matter jurisdiction); Graham v. Distasio, 14-CV-6677 (PKC) (Dkt. 9 (order dated January 23, 2015, dismissing plaintiff's claims relating to her child's education and the loss of custody of her child for failure to state a claim and lack of subject matter jurisdiction)).

In the instant complaint, plaintiff once again challenges decisions issued by the Family Court, State of New York, County of Richmond, that resulted in her loss of custody of her son. (Dkt. 1 ("Compl.").) Plaintiff submits a voluminous complaint naming thirty-eight defendants, most of whom have been named as defendants in her prior proceedings. Many of the allegations are identical or substantially similar to those asserted in plaintiff's prior actions. Once again, plaintiff's complaint reiterates her son's medical history and disputes the decision of the Family Court Judge to grant the father of her child temporary custody. In addition, plaintiff alleges that her son has been "KIDNAPPED and held in the State of New Jersey under a false name...." (Id. at 17 (emphasis in original).) Plaintiff further alleges that "[t]he Judge & Referees have forged [plaintiff's] Court Orders" and ordered plaintiff to stop filing baseless motions. (Id. ) Although unclear, it appears that on or about April 9, 2014, plaintiff was charged with criminal trespass in the third degree, for refusing to leave the offices of the Administration for Children's Services.[1] (Id. at 15 ¶ 12; Exs. 17 & 18.)

Plaintiff requests that this Court: (1) vacate her "ACD Richmond County Criminal Court case... with prejudice [sic]"; (2) report the Richmond County criminal and family courts to the Federal Bureau of Investigation; (3) order all defendants who are attorneys or judges to be disbarred, (4) file a neglect case against all defendants, (5) terminate defendants from their professional positions; and (5) order defendants to pay monetary damages. (Id. at 18 ¶ IV.)

STANDARD OF REVIEW

A complaint must plead "enough facts to state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face." Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 570 (2007). "A claim has facial plausibility when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged." Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662, 678 (2009). Although all allegations contained in the complaint are assumed to be true, this tenet is "inapplicable to legal conclusions." Id. In reviewing a pro se complaint, the court must be mindful that the plaintiff's pleadings should be held to "less stringent standards than formal pleadings drafted by lawyers." Hughes v. Rowe, 449 U.S. 5, 9 (1980) (internal quotation marks omitted); Erickson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89, 94 (2007) (same). The Court is obliged to construe plaintiff's pleadings liberally and interpret them as raising the strongest arguments they suggest. Harris v. Mills, 572 F.3d 66, 72 (2d Cir. 2009). Nevertheless, under 28 U.S.C. § 1915(e)(2)(B), a district court is required to dismiss sua sponte an in forma pauperis action where it is satisfied that the action "(i) is frivolous or malicious; (ii) fails to state a claim on which relief may be granted; or (iii) seeks monetary relief against a defendant who is immune from such relief." An action is "frivolous" when either: (1) "the factual contentions are clearly baseless, ' such as when allegations are the product of delusion or fantasy"; or (2) "the claim is based on an indisputably meritless legal theory.'" Livingston v. Adirondack Beverage Co., 141 F.3d 434, 437 (2d Cir. 1998) (internal citation omitted).

A plaintiff seeking to bring a lawsuit in federal court must establish that the court has subject matter jurisdiction over the action. See, e.g., Rene v. Citibank NA, 32 F.Supp.2d 539, 541-42 (E.D.N.Y. 1999). "[F]ailure of subject matter jurisdiction is not waivable and may be raised at any time by a party or by the court sua sponte. If subject matter jurisdiction is lacking, the action must be dismissed." Lyndonville Sav. Bank & Trust Co. v. Lussier, 211 F.3d 697, 700-01 (2d Cir. 2000) (citations omitted); see Fed.R.Civ.P. 12(h)(3).

DISCUSSION

I. Claims Related to Criminal Proceedings

Insofar as plaintiff alleges that her federal rights are being violated in connection with her pending state criminal proceedings and seeks to enjoin the criminal prosecution, abstention is appropriate under the Sprint framework and the Younger doctrine.

In Younger v. Harris, 401 U.S. 37, 43-44 (1971), the Supreme Court held that federal courts should abstain from granting injunctive relief against a state criminal prosecution instituted in good faith unless certain exceptions are met. The Second Circuit has held that " Younger abstention is appropriate when: 1) there is an ongoing state proceeding; 2) an important state interest is implicated; and 3) the plaintiff has an avenue open for review of constitutional claims in the state court." Hansel v. Town Ct. for the Town of Springfield, N.Y., 56 F.3d 391, 393 (2d Cir. 1995); Koltun v. Berry, 13 CV 1612, 2013 WL 3816603, at *5 (S.D.N.Y. July 19, 2013). In Sprint Commc'ns, Inc. v. Jacobs, 134 S.Ct. 584, 591-92 (2013), "the Supreme Court rejected this three-part test in favor of a categorical approach." Mir v. Shah, 569 Fed.App'x 48, 50 (2d Cir. 2014). Instead, the Supreme Court held that the Younger doctrine applies only to three classes of state court proceedings: 1) "state criminal prosecutions"; (2) "civil enforcement proceedings"; and (3) civil proceedings that "implicate a State's interest in enforcing the orders and judgments of its courts." Id. at 588 (internal quotation marks omitted); see id. at 591 ("We have not applied Younger outside these three exceptional' categories, and today hold... that they define Younger 's scope.").

Thus, absent extraordinary circumstances, this Court must abstain from exercising jurisdiction over plaintiff's federal claims where doing so would intrude into ongoing state criminal proceedings. Sprint Commc'ns, Inc., 134 S.Ct. at 591 (citing New Orleans Pub. Serv., Inc. v. Council of City of New Orleans, 491 U.S. 350, 368 (1989)). Here, jurisdiction over plaintiff's claims, which include a request to vacate her criminal case and institute a number of actions against members of the criminal court, unquestionably would interfere with state criminal proceedings. See Manchanda v. Bose, 14 CV 9658, 2015 WL 81998, at *1-2 (S.D.N.Y. Jan. 6, 2015) (because plaintiff seeks to review, intervene in, or enjoin pending state criminal proceedings, court must abstain pursuant to Younger from exercising jurisdiction over plaintiff's federal claims). Plaintiff has not alleged extraordinary circumstances that would justify such interference. Plaintiff's ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.